Immigration In The United States Essay

1983 words - 8 pages

Immigration is what has made America what it is today. An immigrant is a person who comes to a country to take up permanent residence. Everyone in the United States of America is an immigrant either moving here themselves or being directly related to someone who did. All of us came from different parts of the world even as far back as the Native Americans when they emigrated from Asia to the United States. Immigration is needed to grow America with new cultures and ideas. Immigration is a necessity, but the way its being controlled now is not functioning well because we are not fair in choosing the citizens we allow in, thus making illegal immigration rise.
An important man in history by the name of Christopher Columbus immigrated to America in 1492. “He landed somewhere in the Caribbean, marking the first encounter of Europeans with the New World” (Purcell 139). Almost a hundred years later Sir Walter Raleigh sent ships over to America to explore and eventually established “Virginia”. Since then, more and more explorers came to America and “marked their territory” as their own. Some important immigration stories were of black African slaves and the people on the Mayflower landing in Plymouth and making that their home.
In 1921 congress passed the first comprehensive immigration restriction law. “This law set a limit on the total immigration and imposing a quota system based on the nations of origin” (Purcell 140). About nine years later a four-year period of negative immigration begins causing more immigrants to leave America than come to America. Another nine years later and almost all immigration were stopped because of World War II. The Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 brought in a new era of the Immigration policy. “This Act is the legislation that eliminated the national origin quotas and substituted upper limits on total immigration with a system of graded family and occupational preferences determining who would be allowed to fill the overall quotas” (Purcell 145). This act is still the basic template that we use today.
A more recent act was passed call the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 which was planned to stop or lessen the problem of illegal aliens. Congress passed the second version of this act in 1990 to raise the annual limit on total immigration but cut the number of family related admissions to help the occupational and economic development. (Purcell 142)
In 2007 the United States Department of Homeland Security estimates 11.8 million immigrants to are unauthorized in the United States. From this count approximately 59% of them were from Mexico. The unauthorized immigrant amount decreased in 2007 to 2009 by two-thirds from 2000 to 2005. “When Obama was president in 2012 he signed off on a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals to allow some undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to stay in the country” (Historical).
Currently, through Obamacare, there is the Affordable Care...

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