Immigration Policy In The United States

2012 words - 8 pages

     
     We are now in the 21st century and like the beginning of the 20th century the United States finds itself in the throes of a period of mass immigration. More then one million immigrants enter the Unites States, both legally and illegally every single year. Many argue that this new wave of mass immigration may help sustain the success that our nation is having in regard to the way of living that many American have come accustomed to and yet others believe that although our nation was created by immigrants it is time to "shut down" our borders. The truth of the matter is that there will always be issues in regard to immigration and the policies that the government sets forth in order control who comes into this country. Also now more then ever immigration policy has a greater affect on the American people because of the fact that we find our selves living in a time of danger or as some might argue, a perceived danger in regard to terrorism. Also with the proposal of President Bush?s new guest-worker program raises more issues in regard to immigration. The following paper will attempt to overview current immigration policy and also state what immigration policy should be over the next 25 years.

     Current policy on immigration is something that should not only be considered through notion that the only people that come to the United States now days are illegal immigrants. The reality is that when the topic of immigration comes up the first thing to usually jump into peoples mind is that immigration is synonymous with illegal immigration. However the United States immigration policy is one that responds to the many different yet essential questions about the nature of American society. For example who and what kind of person should be allowed to become members of United States society? Should we continue to allow foreigners the option of entering our nation and if so, how many? What will be the role that the newly arrived immigrants play in a society that values education and hard work? However the most important question one must ask is how can current policy and new policy control manage the flow of immigrants?

     There is not doubt that the United States is a nation of immigrants; however for many immigrants who come to this country today there experiences are often not what they expected. More times then not many people find themselves frustrated and unable to sustain themselves. It is my opinion that American and the government should be willing to greet these new arrivals with open arms rather then the giant bureaucracy that has become immigrant policy today. For those who seek to come to this country by legal means it is only fair that the nation should be responsive and welcoming. However although it is necessary for the system to welcome legal immigrants to the US it is also very important for the government to battle illegal immigration as well.

The reforming of America?s immigration policy is something that can no...

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