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Immigration To The United States Of America From European Countries

1793 words - 7 pages

Immigration is an act of coming to a foreign country to live. The act of leaving home country is called emigration. Throughout the years of human developing, process of immigration-emigration (migration) was a big part of society life and relations within it, so it has never stopped, while the hearths of migration has been changing constantly. After Columbus had discovered America in 1492, it became one of the most popular destination of immigration. First, newcomers were Spanish colonists who sought for gold pyramids of Indians, then in America outsiders such as Puritans found their home . According to the website of United Nations, The United States of America, a country created from 13 colonies, is now ranked first by foreign-born population (2013) . It is worth noting that the immigration to the USA was not always constant. Historians distinguish four periods when the rate of immigration was enormous, so-called "waves". The first wave continued until 1775, the second one started in 1820 and ended in 1870, the third massive thread of immigrants faced by the USA was from 1880 to 1920-1930, and the last one by today started in 1965 . The third wave is considered the largest one (J. Bryant, 2014) and is of particular interest to study. It resulted in either internal and external policies of the USA in a significant way. Nowadays situation is believed that America is being filled by a large number of Latin American immigrants which come to the State either legally or not, so that studying immigration proves to be actual.
Firstly, we should say why so many Europeans decided to leave their home and come across the ocean to an unfamiliar country. The working conditions at factories for low classes in Europe in the end of 19th century were unfair. Such examples as children labour, 12-hour shifts and living in barracks were quite common throughout Europe and are known to anyone. Moreover, the northern part of the continent suffered of a lack of fertile lands, the East and South still had to deal with feudalism, for noblemen were main landowners there. Particularly, the Irish sought for freedom from the English. In rapidly industrialized Germany emigration became common as local authorities were eager to assist the departure of people who might become public charges.
The numbers of immigrants were slightly different among the countries and depended on the region. In the end of the 19th century, more immigrants were coming from southern and central Europe than those from northern and western Europe. Immigration from the Scandinavian countries (Sweden, Denmark and Norway) increased significantly in the late 19th century. The Swedes were stimulated to immigrate by famine and crop failure, when the Danes and the Norwegians went to America to escape high unemployment in their countries and occupy open lands in which the Scandinavian Peninsula was lacking . Persecuted by the Russian government, Finns in large numbers began to come to the US at the...

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