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Immigration To The United States Essay

759 words - 3 pages

Immigration to the United States
Works Cited Not Included

Immigration to the United States has been happening since the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock in 1492. America is one of the most diverse nations in the world, attracting people from every corner of the globe in hopes of a better way of life. America in the past has relied on migrant workers to balance the economies growth when internal resources have been exhausted; moreover, the agriculture business has depended on the seasonal employment of migrant workers from Mexico to meet the labor demand. Programs have been created in the past granting work contracts for the flood of Mexican labor into the United States, and new work programs are being analyzed to suffice the needs of the agriculture business today.

During World War II America was pushed to exhaustion trying to reach the labor efforts needed to support the war. Looking for a way to relieve the tension, the federal government came to an agreement with the Mexican government to allow contract workers in to come to the United States to assist the agriculture business in the Southwest. From 1942 to 1964 the Bracero work program supplemented the America workforce. Almost 4.5 million flooded America, a vast majority of these workers were allocated to three states: California, Arizona, and Texas. Four terms where met between Mexico and America federal government, these four terms laid out the ground rules for the program until its fall in 1964. These four terms are stated as:

1. Mexican contract workers would not engage in U.S. military service.

2. Mexicans entering the U.S. under provisions of the agreement would not be subjected to discriminatory acts.

3. Workers would be guaranteed transportation, living expenses, and repatriation along the lines established under Article 29 of Mexican labor laws.

4. Mexicans entering under the agreement would not be employed either to displace domestic workers or to reduce their wages. (Garcia).

The U.S.- Mexico Bracero program was originated in Stockton, Ca., on August 4, 1942. The immigrant workers also faced harsh conditions, most of the work that was left for the immigrants was work that no one else was willing to do. Summarized best, “During the United States– Mexico Bracero Program, 1942-1964, U.S. agribusiness employed a coercive factory regime, introduced mechanization and increased work hazards, and employed a dual wage structure to keep...

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