Influence Of Patriarchy In A Doll’s House Is A Play Written By Henrik Ibsen

1534 words - 6 pages

A Doll’s House is a play written by Henrik Ibsen. Set in the late eighteen hundreds, the play depicts a well off family living in Norway. As the play begins the reader meets Nora, a childish young women who loves to spend money and make sure everyone knows it. Her husband Torvald appears from his study and instantly one sees the type of relationship that the two share. Torvald speaks to Nora in such a way that gives the impression that he does see her as anything more than his trophy wife. Throughout the play the absence of a father plays a huge role in the development of events that take place in the play. Particularly, Nora, who is scrutinized for not having a respectable father figure in her developmental years. Nora’s actions are a tell tale sign of the patriarchal role that Torvald and the other men have over the women in the society they live in. However, at the end of the play, the patriarchal authority in Nora’s life shifts and gives her what she has always dreamed of. The influence of patriarchy in A Doll’s House changed Nora, which gave her the power to think for herself and create the life she has always wanted.
In the first act, it is the day before Christmas and Nora enters with a plethora of gifts for her family. She gives the delivery boy a generous tip and continues to unpack the gifts. She makes little noise, but just enough for her husband, Torvald, to here that she is home. He calls to her “Is that my little squirrel fussing about in there?” (Ibsen 333). She asks Torvald to come out of his study to see what she bought. As soon as she says that he immediately goes to see. They exchange few words about spending money and Nora tells him that if they run out they can borrow some. Torvald responds by saying “Nora! (taking her playfully by the ear) There you go again! Scatterbrain! […]” (Ibsen 333). At this point the reader starts to get a glimpse as to how Torvald feels about Nora and the topic of money. The conversation continues and Torvald makes more comments towards Nora. “What do we call those little birds that fly through their money?” “[…] Spendthrifts are sweet, but they spend and awful lot of money. You have no idea what it costs a man to feed theses little birds” (Ibsen 335). Torvald believes that Nora spends too much money and that she doesn’t understand how the flow of money works. He informs her on the good that comes with saving their money and spending wisely. Through in-depth research many articles have been written on this very topic. Henrik Ibsen was very advanced in his language as a playwright. Translations of his works have been made through several different languages. Akerholt describes, “That point is that the words are as ambiguous as Torvald’s attitude towards Nora. He is proud of his doll-wife, […] he even puts her on a pedestal for […] her womanly qualities, at the same time as he reproaches her for them.” (Akerholt online). The dialect in this play is specifically picked for a reason. The little words...

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