Importance Of Role Models In To Kill A Mockingbird

1457 words - 6 pages

Take a moment to think, what would you do if you didn’t have your parents/guardians? How would you be acting? Where would you be? Adults have a big part in a child’s life not only because they are there to support them but being role models to show them how they should be acting and maturing over time. The novel “To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee” takes place in a small town named Maycomb and it has a great deal to do with children maturing over time and how adults come into place as role models. The 3 main role models in this story are: The father Atticus Finch, The house keeper Calpurnia, And the neighbour across the street Miss Maudie. In this essay you will be reading about how the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” illustrates how adult role-models directly influence the maturation of children.
The most important role model that takes place in To Kill a Mockingbird is someone who
has raised two kids on his own, he has equal respect for the blacks and whites unlike the rest of the town and is the most trustworthy person you will ever meet. His name is Atticus Finch. Atticus likes to try and keep every thing a secret from his children, for instance he does not like to brag about his skills like shooting a gun when he is needed to kill the rabid dog that is just down the road. Atticus is considered the most trustworthy person in the book because he is always answering questions for Jem and Scout or he is giving them advice. For example, when Scout get's into a fight at school with Cecil Jacobs because Cecil told Scout she was a coward and so was her father because he was a N***** lover and that's all he has ever been, Scout shoved a pencil into his arm and beat him up for it. She was sent to the principals office and then home for the remainder of the day. That night Scout and Atticus had a large talk about scout and needing to go to school because it is extremely important. She made a deal with her father that if she continued to to go to school, then the two of them would continue reading every night as they had been doing since she was a baby. One last thing Atticus had told Scout that night was “you might hear some ugly talk about the trial at school, but do one thing for me if you will: you just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t let 'em get your goat. Try fighting with your head for a change. Its a good one, even if it does resist learning.”
First is the worst and second is the best! Right? No that's not right but the second most important role model in to Kill a Mockingbird could be considered the most important from another persons point of view. Calpurnia is a black female house keeper for the Finch house hold and is like a Mother to Jem and Scout. Calpurnia is a very strict motherly figure to Jem and Scout and manners are very important to her. For example when Scout had invited Walter Cunningham JR over for dinner on the night that she...

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