"Importance Of The Sioux Women In The Sioux Camp".

676 words - 3 pages

This essay was written to discuss the importance of the Sioux women in a SiouxIndian Camp, their jobs, expectations and most generally all their daily chores, also why they did these things and how it might have affected everyone else in the camp.The Sioux women in the SiouxIndian Camp were seen as more or less even in importance as the men were in many books I have read, but as I wrote I this essay I changed what I had thought. The Sioux women had to do indoor and some outdoor work, were as the men only did out door, but you might think otherwise as you read...The women simply had to breed to make more Sioux's which is common sense! First the women had to cook all the food to provide the family with delicious treatments, this was hard as they did not the advantages we have today, instead they had to use bags made form buffalo skin, and may I mention the women had to sew these as well, any way I don't think that it was that easy to keep the bag from ripping our dripping unlike sauce pans or bowls in our days. The women also had to care for the children to keep them healthy and in shape, they had to also take care of all animals in the family's possession or else they would not fit for carrying all the objects during any time the camp had to move due to the buffalo moving. The women had to prepare all clothes used by family members, the clothes had to be sewed from scratch and made to fit each person. The women also had to do out door work like prepare the tepee and also take it down when ever the camp moves or stops. Women were dependant on for taking of the young girls after they are over the age 10/12 but the boys would be trained by their fathers to become warriors. I also want to...

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