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In A Democracy Essay

649 words - 3 pages

In a Democracy...."Men do not seek authority so that they may impose policy, they seek policy so that they may achieve authority"The campaign promise is the trademark of our political candidates. They have staffers that research what issues are of utmost importance to the American People then they bombard my television with ads that if elected they will impose policy that I, as a citizen have stated I desire. But more often than not the promises they made are empty. It was merely a ploy to get me and the rest of the voting public to place them in the position they desired, a position coveted by many, the title of President of the United States and Leader of the Free World. It is a selfish pursuit of power for its own sake, and it is absolute with these candidates. Politicians will side with the NRA, FDA EPA, Pro-life activists or interest groups who support education reform and promise to implement their policies ...view middle of the document...

The Constitution was written with the idea of making the United States a representative democracy, one in which we elect public officials based on their ability and desire to work towards the best interests of our country. These leaders are the foundation of our democracy, and are supposed to be a link between what the citizens want and what the government does. They are supposed to impose the policies that willbring about the changes we desire, but history shows that politicians seek out extremely powerful interest groups, especially those that can influence congressional votes, by promising to enact their issues, if the interest groups will vote for them. This is an attempt to gain political office and can result in government policy that is created and implemented not with regard to its effectiveness as government policy or for the good of government, but only with regard to its value as a tool for accumulating and maintaining power.Presidential candidates will usually take the popular stand on issues affecting our nation, and one issue that historically Americans have strongly asserted the importance of is the improvement of public schools in the United States. With the education system in serious trouble, education is becoming a more important political issue in this country. Arguably, is the most serious concern of Americans, above crime, the environment, and the economy. It seems that in every election, no matter how big or small, education is always an important issue of debate. Both President Clinton and President Bush before him informed the American people prior to their election to office, that they would be "The Education President". Politicians often promise more educational programs and more funding for schools, but in unfortunate contrast to their promises, policymakers seem to view spending money on schools as an irritating cost rather than an important investment. To achieve the quality of education that society will demand, the government would have to reinvent the system of public schools. These two presidents promised to impose dramatic policy changes, but once in power their actions towards implementing policy have been lack-luster at best.

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