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In The Book Great Expectations, Who Most Influcened Pip? Book: Great Expectations Author: Charles Dickens

1153 words - 5 pages

"Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, as I may say, and one man's a blacksmith, and one's a whitesmith, and one's a goldsmith, and one's a coppersmith. Divisions among such must come, and must be met as they come." Pip was influenced greatly by four people: Joe of influencing Pip's decisions. However all four characters greatly affected Pip in Gargery, Herbert Pocket, Miss Havisham, and Abel Magwitch. Each person had a different way his quest to become a gentleman.Joe Gargery is Pip's foster father as well as his brother in-law. But Joe and Pip both believe the other is their own equal. Joe was raised in an abusive family and because of this Joe frequently shields Pip from Pip's angry mother. Joe has always taught Pip to be loving and respectful to his friends and family. But when Pip is first invited to Miss Havisham's house to play with Estella he quickly becomes embarrassed of his past. Joe does not understand why Pip is angry with him but still tries to help Pip. Much of Pip's kindness comes from Joe, when Estella makes fun of Pip for calling the cards "jacks" Pip does not retaliate but instead ignores her. Pip does not begin to appreciate Joe's lessons until much later in the novel. "Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, as I may say, and one man's a blacksmith, and one's a whitesmith, and one's a goldsmith, and one's a coppersmith. Divisions among such must come, and must be met as they come." Joe says these words to Pip as a farewell in chapter 27, after their awkward meeting in London. Pip, now a gentleman, has been uncomfortably embarrassed by both Joe's low social standings and his own lavish lifestyle, while Joe has felt like a fish out of water in Pip's extravagant apartment. Joe tells Pip that he does not blame him for the awkwardness of their meeting, but he instead blames the natural divisions of life. Joe relates metalsmithing to the awkwardness of their meeting by describing these natural divisions: some men are blacksmiths, such as Joe, and some men are goldsmiths, such as Pip. In these simple terms, Joe arrives at a wise and resigned attitude toward the changes in Pip's social class that have driven them apart. He shows his loyalty and goodness by blaming the division not on Pip but on the unalterable nature of humans. Pip now realizes that he has ignored his past and goes back to the marsh to thank Joe and his past friends."True, he replied. I'll redeem it at once. Let me introduce the topic, Handel, by mentioning that in London it is not the custom to put the knife in the mouth-for fear of accidents-and that while the fork is reserved for that use, it is not put further in than necessary. It is scarcely worth mentioning, only it's as well to do as other people do. Also, the spoon is not generally used overhand, but under. This has two advantages. You get at your mouth better (which after all is the object), and you save a good deal of the attitude of...

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