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In The Mind Of The Fallen (An Analysis Of Satan’s Primary Motivations In Milton’s Paradise Lost)

739 words - 3 pages

Beginning at a young age, people are taught to always be obedient to God or else you will face consequences. We are later taught that if you sin and don’t repent, you will end up in Hell after death with Satan. Satan is always referred to the worst possible thing in the world and ruler of the fallen ruled. But who really is this being called Satan? Why is he always in opposition of God? Satan personifies evil and temptation. He is known to deceive humans and lead them astray. In Milton’s Paradise Lost, Satan has three primary motivations: power, revenge, and praise.
To begin, Satan’s first motivation and central idea to the story is power. Satan was once an angel of God’s, but after some time, he grew jealous. He felt that he should have just as much power as God and be able to do what he wanted. God then announced that he had begotten a son who would rule at his right hand. Satan grew jealous and because of this, he gathered a portion of the angels and turned them against God to fight for the throne. Soon after, a conflict between the fallen angels against God and his Heavenly army erupted. Although Satan was warned that his defeat was imminent, he still persisted. Satan tries to win the battle by using cannons but the good angels move the mountains on top of the traitors, and they are forced to Hell. Satan specifically says, “Here we may reign secure, and in my choice to reign is worth ambition though in Hell: better to reign in Hell, then serve in Heav’n” (Book 1 lines 261-263)
In addition, Satan also seeks revenge against God the whole time. God basically kicked him and his fallen angels out of Heaven to live in the dark, desolate, fiery place of the damned. Satan is mad that he was one of the highest archangels and was passed over to get power by God’s own son. Once in Hell, Satan and his other followers had a meeting to plot against God. He says, “With rallied Arms to try what may be yet regained in...

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