In The Stranger, Relationships Ultimately Have No Meaning To Meursault

1545 words - 6 pages

In past literary discussions our class has studied for our novels we came over the topic of Nature of Reality. After this studied I was able to understand how Meursault’s perception of reality was different from every other characters’ in the book. This had caused Meursault to act like he does in the story. Meursault is quite unresponsive to everything that happens in his life because he finds no reason for them. Since Meursault believed he shouldn’t care about anything, for example relationships, society, or events in his life.
Meursault believes that it is futile to try to explain everything in reality and have a rational reason for everything “I'm not sleepy and there is no place I'm going to”, Camus uses the futility of Meursault’s legal appeals to show that all humans approach death at an equal rate, and that you can’t escape it. Meursault tends to not conform to social norms, and he is in a way separated from society. Meursault’s and society’s apathy towards Maman, his mother’s, funeral, displays the way Camus disregards the value of human life. From this you can see his belief that life has no meaning come from this belief. Meursault chooses to be isolated from common human interaction and relationships. In my essay I will studied the character’s view on detachment and alienation from relationships and acceptance of societal views. Looking into the views of his life and how it leads to him murdering a person can give me a better sight on Meursault’s Absurdist qualities.

In The Stranger, relationships are key parts of the story. Meursault’s interactions with society, relationships, and events in life are shown through, detachment, alienation, and acceptance. The author, Albert Camus, wrote The Stranger during the Existentialist movement, which explains why the main character in the novel, Meursault, is characterized as detached and emotionless. He pushes himself away from society and isolate himself because his perception of reality is different from societies. From what Meursault narrates to the reader in the novel, the reader can understand why he attempts to find order and understanding in a confused and mystifying world. Meursault believes that there is no need for social interaction because there is no point to it. Mesursault didn’t believe his life, along with everyone else’s life, was pointless and that we end up in the same place at the end, which is death. Mesursault’s interactions with society, relationships, and events in life are shown through, detachment, alienation, and acceptance. We can see these beliefs through the actions of his murder and interactions with people in society.
Meursault doesn’t care at all, to him “[i]t was like knocking four quick times on the door of unhappiness” (59). His reaction to the gun shots do not faze him at all. The extra shots are given without any explanation and it shows his behavior is just irrational. There is no meaning to him. He doesn’t second guess himself about this at all....

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