This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

In What Ways Does Hill Employ Animals Alive Or Dead To Develop The Narrative And Our Understanding Of The Characters?

1525 words - 6 pages

Symbolism is a huge part in every novel out there, especially in I' m the King of the Castle. The way Susan Hill expresses most of her symbolism as the story develops is through animals. Susan Hill mentions many animals throughout I'm the King of the Castle. From the crows to the moths and to the dying fish, symbolism behind animals plays a very important part of the novel. This way, Susan Hill gives us a better understanding of the characters and the narrative, like what animals represent who from the story and the fears that Kingshaw has which tells us plenty of his character.The first animal that Susan Hill mentions in I'm the King of the Castle is the crow. The crow is shown when Kingshaw wants to escape Warings, the house in which he is staying with Hooper, and runs of into the cornfield. The crow stars flying over Kingshaw and as Susan Hill mentions in the novel; "Kingshaw could see the feathers of its head, shinning blank in between the butter-coloured cornstalks. Then it rose, and circled, and came down again, this time not quite landing, but flapping about his head, beating its wings and making a sound like flat leather pieces slapped together." This quote is really important for our understanding because not only is Susan Hill using imagery to draw a picture in our heads of how the crow is tormenting Kingshaw, but she is also using the crow to represent Hooper. The crow is teasing and tormenting Kingshaw just like Hooper does. Also the crow is being protective over the cornfield and how Kingshaw is in his territory. This is just how Hooper feels over Warings, which in this case is represented by the cornfield. Hooper, in this case the crow, is kicking Kingshaw out of Warings, in this case the cornfield, because he doesn't want him there.Another important quote from when the crow is chasing Kingshaw is; "He lay with his face in the coarse grass, panting and sobbing by turns, with the sound of his own blood pumping through his ears. He felt the sun on the back of his neck, and his ankle was wrenched." This quote gives us a sort of mood of how Kingshaw is feeling as the crow is after him. He is terrified and practically a mess, which is exactly how Hooper makes him feel, Hooper makes him feel scared and hopeless. Not only does this help us understand the narrative but it also shows us that Kingshaw is weak and sensitive, which means that his past hasn't been the easiest and he has no one to be there for him. It also helps us understand Hooper's character and how he is possessive, especially over his house, and is jealous and furious that Kingshaw is intruding it.Susan Hill does not stop with the crow there though. Later on in the story Hooper puts a stuffed crow in Kingshaw's bed while Kingshaw is sleeping. "He was dry and faint with fear of the thing, though his brain still worked, he knew who had brought it, he knew that Hooper was still waiting out in the corrider, must have seen the light go on. Hooper wanted him to be frightened, to...

Find Another Essay On In what ways does Hill employ animals - alive or dead - to develop the narrative and our understanding of the characters?

In what ways does this dialogue develop your response to Othello in the play as a whole?

531 words - 2 pages Following this mingled conversation in which Desdemona playfully reverses Othello's insinuating diagnosis; Desdemona informs her husband that she has sent for Cassio to speak to Othello. However Othello ignores this piece of information and claiming a cold in the head, asks for her handkerchief. Desdemona expresses regret that she does not have it with her. Othello reproves her for not having and then gives an account of why the handkerchief is

Discuss the ways in which your engagement with the construction of a character or characters in "The Collector" has contributed to your understanding of the text

2238 words - 9 pages As a reader I found that the characters in The Collector contribute to my understanding of the text. In The Collector by John Fowles, the reader's engagement with Miranda and Clegg helps them to understand Fowles idea of a class dominated society, in England during the 1960's. The Collector is a novel that compares the upper middle-class, where Miranda is placed in the societal ladder, and lower working class such as Clegg. Miranda belongs to a

How does Shakespeare introduce and develop the characters of Beatrice and Benedick?

1162 words - 5 pages mentions anyone else. Shakespeare shows this first sign of interest in a fairly subtle way; yet she obviously cares about him by asking if he has returned from war, this clearly being her first line of thought. In the first scene, before Benedick, Claudio, Don Pedro, Don John enter, Beatrice mentions Benedick many times, again showing that she really does think about him and is curious to know how he is. At the beginning of the play, Beatrice is

How does the Church ritualise important moments in our lives to develop our spiritual growth and deepen our relationship with God? - 7 Sacraments

830 words - 3 pages The church ritualises important moments in our lives through the seven sacraments. Sacraments are visible signs or symbols of Gods love and presence. They help to strengthen the Christian person's life so they can carry out the mission of Jesus to bring everyone closer to God. They fill Christians with the new life of Jesus in order to inspire and transform us. The seven commandments are Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Reconciliation

Arthur Miller's 'The Crucible': In what ways does the title of the play add meaning and become reflected in the action, themes, imagery and characters Miller presents us with?

1242 words - 5 pages play. Miller saw the parallels between the McCarthy era and the Salem witch hunts for what they really were - a crucible. Severe trials held in an attempt to separate the good from the evil, the pure from the tainted. Through his text, he shows the frailty and vulnerability of human nature by showing how hypocrisy and hysteria can lead to times of suspicion and instability. He leaves us, his audience, to make our own judgement about similar periods in history and to ask ourselves the question - Is it possible, or even predictable, that this situation will ever occur again?

Does the Concept of Negative Priming Contribute to Our Understanding of Selective Attention?

1863 words - 7 pages psychologists. Broadbend was one of the first to define the theory of selective attention. He supposed that attention is like a filter that processes the received information further and rejects the irrelevant information. The key point of his research is that selective attention either processes the information to level of understanding its meaning or does not . Irrelevant information, according to this theory, gets not more than initial

How does the director, Pete Weir, shape our response to the issue of conformity versus individualism in the film Dead Poets Society?

829 words - 3 pages 370791XStage 1: EnglishHow does the director, Pete Weir, shape our response to the issue of conformity versus individualism in the film Dead Poets Society? Respond to the question in an essay.In the film Dead Poets Society there are two main issues that are focused upon. These two issues include the battle between whether conformity or individualism is right. We are shown the two end results of choosing both of the different approaches with your

Compare the ways that Mr Briggs and Mrs Kay are presented in 'Our Day Out'. With whom does Willy Russell intend us to sympathise?

1217 words - 5 pages get to an animal and many were just over-excited at the prospect of having something that they would never have.Mr Briggs' encounter with Carol Chandler is a defining moment of the play because when Carol is on the top of the cliff we can see that Mr Briggs does not know what it is like to be Carol and children like her in that situation. He is taken aback at the fact that Carol talks back at him which he is not use to. Carol doesn't want to go

How does the text "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee broaden our understanding of people and the world around us?

961 words - 4 pages The text, "To kill a mockingbird" broadens our understanding of people and the world around us. It does that by presenting to the reader a number of important issues which are relevant to us today. These issues include racism, prejudice, and the co-existence of good and evil.Racism is an important issue that is still present in today's society and relevant to the community. This is also one of the most important theme presented in the book

How does syntactic and semantic knowledge contribute to our understanding of a piece of text

2426 words - 10 pages How does syntactic and semantic knowledge contribute to our understanding of a piece of textThe Little Oxford dictionary (1986) defines syntactic knowledge as "the grammatical arrangement of words/rules or analysis of this", while semantic knowledge is described as knowledge "of the meaning in language."But what is comprehension? Anderson claims "comprehension involves a perceptual stage, followed by a parsing stage, followed by a utilisation

Timberlake Wertenbaker : Our Country's Good - The redemptive power of theatre : How does the experience of putting on a play affect the characters in Our Country's Good

3519 words - 14 pages production of "Our Country's Good" for his fellow prisoners. He wrote many letters to Wertenbaker explaining what it was like holding a play in the prison. He explains how acting can release any pain or sorrow that a prisoner can have."Prison is about failure normally, and how we are reminded of it each day of every year. Drama, and self-expression in general, is a refuge and one of the only real weapons against the hopelessness of these places."White

Similar Essays

To What Extent Do The Catcher In The Rye And The Great Gatsby Use Symbolism To Develop The Reader’s Understanding Of The Characters?

2120 words - 9 pages In The Catcher in the Rye and The Great Gatsby, symbols are used consistently by the writers throughout the novel to cause Holden and Gatsby to behave and react in specific ways. By doing this, the authors allow the reader to see the full multi-dimensional character intended for us to read, and not the persona they portray. Salinger uses symbolism as a subtle way of communicating Holden’s emotions and vulnerabilities to the reader, and symbolism

In What Ways Does This Dialogue In Act Three Four Develop Your Response To Othello And Desdemona In The Play?

1484 words - 6 pages very short sentences but in a questioning fashion "Is't possible?" This shows Desdemona's character to be rather naïve, she sees the handkerchief as unsubstantial by not understanding what the handkerchief really symbolises to Othello. Through her lack of knowledge it appears to Othello that Desdemona doesn't really care for Othello's love, this is shown by the happy and childish tone she vacates through the dialogue of short curious

How Does Bruce Bonafede Demonstrate The Different Ways In Which The Characters Of This Modern Drama Develop The Courage To Compromise Their Happin

1327 words - 6 pages modern drama explores the idea of how these individuals deal with numerous dilemmas choosing to either compromise their happiness, or letting personal desires come first. Bruce Bonafede, displays many ways in which the characters of this text make difficult choices throughout the play, in order to protect those who they care for, make the safer decision which also is beneficial to the individual. The characters accomplish this through sacrifice and

In What Ways Does Tennessee Williams Challenge The Conventions Of Naturalistic Theatre In The Glass Menagerie In Order To Develop His Main Themes?

1346 words - 6 pages better in a naturalistic play.In the production notes, Williams criticises naturalism or what he calls "the photographic in art". He uses expressionistic devices throughout the play - the narrator, fire escape, stage directions, the transparent fourth wall, and the music and screen devices.The narrator is a non-naturalistic convention because as said in the introduction to scene 1, "the narrator is an undisguised convention of the play. He takes