In Youre View How Has Dawe Revealed Important Poetic Techniques

623 words - 2 pages

In your view how have poetic techniques been used to reveal important ideas in Dawe's and Slessor's poetry?

Poetic techniques have been used in Bruce Dawe's "homecoming" and Kenneth Slessor's "beach Burial" to reveal important ideas. The diction used in these poems conveys the themes and meanings. Both poems are elegies that contain allegories to emphasise how soldiers are enemies during war but unified at death. The common themes in these poems are how war doesn't celebrate the heroic status of soldiers and the tragic waste of life during war. These are all delivered by language and poetic techniques.

One of the important ideas revealed by Homecoming is the repetitive nature of war. Dawe uses repetition as a poetic technique in the phrase "all day, day after day, they're bringing them home" as a remark that war and the result of it is a constant is a consistent cycle in human life. Dawe amplifies this idea through the sorrowful tone that remains consistent throughout the poem. The sorrowful tone in the metaphor "dead seamen, gone in search for the same landfall" challenges the responder to reflect and develop the idea war is a totally dehumanising element. In contrast, to the consistent sorrowful tone of Dawes "homecoming", Slessor's "Beach burial" creates a false mood in the first stanza. Subdued and exemplified in the lines "softly and humbly to the golf of Arabs" in the first line of the poem causes the audience to transcend from the false sense of calmness to the realisation that the poem is in reference to dead soldiers.

The soldiers in both poems are classified as anonymous and are not distinguished between each other. Slessor uses descriptive language in the lines to illustrate that these soldiers are washed away and their tombstones have no writing on them further depicting their anonymity. "Unknown seamen-the ghostly pencil wavers and fades". The little recognition...

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