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Inclusion Special Ed Essay

707 words - 3 pages

Inclusion Special Ed

INCLUSION OF SPECIAL ED STUDENTS

Inclusive education means that all students in a school, despite their strengths or weaknesses in any area, become part of the school community. They are included in the feeling of belonging among other students, teachers, and support staff. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its 1997 amendments make it clear that schools have a duty to educate children with disabilities in general education classrooms. These federal regulations include rulings that guide the regulation. The IDEA requires that children with disabilities be educated in regular education classrooms unless "the nature and severity of the disability is such that education in the regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily." This means that schools have a duty to try to include students with disabilities in the regular general education classes.

Inclusion, however, does not mean that the special needs child must learn everything and do as well as the other children in the classroom. Their grading is based how well they are learning in relation to their individual education plan set up by the Child Study Team. The following charts gives examples of some adaptations that may be made, just to give a general idea of how the inclusion policy can be fair to all students:

Nine Types of Adaptations

Size Time Level of Support

Adapt the number of items that the learner is expected to learn or complete.For example: Reduce the number of social studies terms a learner must learn at any one times.

Adapt the time allotted and allowed for learning, task completion, or testing.For example:Individualize a timeline for completing a task; pace learning differently (increase or decrease) for some learners. Increase the amount of personal assistance with a specific learner.For example:Assign peer buddies, teaching assistants, peer tutors, or cross-age tutors.

Input Difficulty Output

Adapt the way instruction is delivered to the learner.For example:Use different visual aids, plan more concrete examples, provide hands-on activities, place students in cooperative groups. Adapt the skill level, problem...

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