Independence In Jane Eyre Essay

705 words - 3 pages

Jane Eyre Essayindependence

Jane Eyre, a novel written by Charlotte Bronte, is about a young girl named Jane that struggles to discover her identity. Jane’s a girl who is “unhappy, very unhappy”(23). She grows up with relatives that treat her unfairly because her diseased family was not wealthy. Jane’s uncle Mr. Reed had reminded his wife and family to consider Jane as their own, but in contrast she experienced physical abuse by her aunt and cousin John. “John Reed knocked me down and my aunt shut me up in the red-room...”(23), the abuse that Jane experienced impacted her young soul, but also helped her grow into a stronger person. Unlike her cousins, Jane’s childhood was unpleasant because “...I have no father or mother, brothers or sister...”(23). Years later, Jane goes to Lowood institution where she succeeds and becomes a school teacher. From there, Jane meets Mr. Rochester who turns out to be the love of her life. Throughout the novel the readers see a dependent girl transform into an independent young lady that overcomes all her tribulations.

Charlotte Bronte allows us to trace Jane‘s character. While at Gateshead, Jane is a dependent young girl learning and yearning to be independent. Jane acknowledges that without Mrs. Reed’s assistance of financial issues and disciplinary actions, she wouldn’t be able to survive. “Benefactress!...They all called Mrs. Reed my benefactress;”, here Jane declares she knows who's responsible for raising her. Jane’s independency is also shown at Gateshead because she grows up on her own. She ate, read and played by herself, Jane also knew how to please herself without the presence of others. Although Mrs. Reed and her children were mean and cruel to Jane, they made a substantial difference in her life.

In chapters one through ten, we noticed that Jane was both needy and self-directed, but starting in chapter eleven Jane becomes fully independent. At Thornfield she’s a governess, Jane adapts to the new environment without the help of those around her. An independent woman has many...

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