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The Indian Removal Act Essay

762 words - 3 pages

Indian Removal Act
In 1830, the Jackson administration instated the Indian Removal Act. This act removed the Native Americans from their ancestral lands to make way for an increase of additional American immigrants. This act forced many Native American tribes from their homes including five larger tribes, Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creek, and Seminole. These tribes had populations were estimated to be around 65,000 people strong that lived in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. (Foner, 2012) The American Indians fought for their rights and beliefs through the American court system. Their other objective other than fighting for their rights was but in the end, they were forced out of their homes to move west of the Mississippi River.
Treaties
The United States Government began to make treaties with the different tribes to allow them to remain on their land and guaranteed peace and the integrity of Indian territories, primarily to assure that the lucrative fur trade would continue without interruption. (Kidwell, 2010) Though the United States claimed that they believed that if the tribes could show that they were civilized Indians and they could be assimilated into the American population they would be allowed to remain on their land, the American people seen the land as theirs and would use whatever force necessary to take it. Even though the Cherokee people had shown their willingness to abide by the treaties set forth by becoming successful farmers and slave owners, and adopted their own laws and constitution to live by. They did create An educational program as required by the treaties, however Congress still viewed them as savages and supported states such as Georgia to take their land. (Foner, 2012)
Worcester V. Georgia
When the United States began to go back on their word to allow the Indians to live in peace on their lands, they joined with local missionaries to help them fight for their rights in court. Samuel Worcester was a missionary working with in the Cherokee nation and had become a respected man in their community and assisted in the understanding of legal rights under the US Constitution and the federal-Cherokee treaties. When the Georgia government realized that Worcester was helping the Cherokee, they arrested him a total of three times; the last time, he was convicted along with other...

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