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Industrial Revolution Essay In 1st Person Point Of View. Speaking As A Member Of The House Of Commons, I Explain The Horrible Working Conditions, And Why Child Labor Was Essential For The Time.

567 words - 2 pages

Industrial Revolution EssayI have recently been elected to the House of Commons. I will be serving on the Committee for social well being. The Industrial Revolution has flourished in our great country. As a result, we have become the greatest and most wealthy industrial nation in the world. Unfortunately, many of our citizens are beginning to question our blessed industry as a hidden curse. Many feel that the industry we have so proudly built is leading to the downfall of our society as a whole. In my investigation, I'm going to determine the effects the Industrial Revolution has had on our people.During the Industrial Revolution, England's' poverty-stricken seemed uncomplaining of their poor conditions. They took things how they were and knew there was no way in getting out of it. To keep themselves going in life, they believed in god. They thought that god would make up for everything in the next life, and they would be happier then. Religion and faith was so important to these people. It was the only thing that gave them hope. People's lifestyles were horrible. They were consisted of disease, poverty, overcrowded cities, inadequate housing, and unemployment. Not much happiness was found for these people, but religion and faith in god gave them enough happiness to live.Child labor played an important role in the Industrial Revolution. Children worked at very young ages and were paid less. They were expected to work to help pay for their family needs. The lifestyles and conditions for the children during the industrial age were harsh. They had 16 hour work days, terrible working conditions, low wages, and were beat if they messed up or if they were late for work. Parliament acts against child labor were...

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