'industrialisation Depended Largely On More Efficient Transport Systems.' Discuss This View On The Growing Industrialisation On Nineteenth Century Europe.

564 words - 2 pages

Industrialisation depended largely on more efficient transport systems only to a small extent. Firstly, transportation systems were bettered partly due to industrialisation as it was during this period that the usage of new mechanical techniques and power driven machinery were pioneered. Secondly, it has to be brought to light that before the invention of the locomotives and the introduction of the railway system, the usage of coastal and river traffic as well as horse-drawn road to transport raw materials were widely use. The coming of railway system and the steam-powered vessels only shortened the transportation time and made it more efficient. Thirdly, industrialisation also depended on other factors such as the role of the government, the improvement in technology, the banking system, the infrastructure and the level of education besides the efficient transport system.In the growing industrialisation, transportation was needed to deliver raw materials and industrial goods from one place to another. As railroads became one of the most sought after form of transportation, especially in Britain, the irons as well as the engineering industry were boosted, as iron was needed for the production of locomotives. Britain and Germany have an integrated transport system, which is dominated by railways to carry goods and passengers. France, on the other hand, uses canals more than any other form of transport to convey cargo that are needed for agriculture or the industries. Transport was thus significant in the growing industry, as it needed largely to deliver goods.The industrialisation was also depended on the availability of natural resources. The main source of power for transportation fuel was coal and this could be found in Britain, France and Germany in abundance. The huge usage of coal in...

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