Interpreting Cultural Dialects Essay

629 words - 3 pages

The connection between language and culture is closely linked because language is employed to share cultural relationships. In every culture there are basic values for common communication such as eye contact or body language and there are certain gestures that have distinct meanings in diverse cultures. For example, some gestures are considered offensive in some traditions, yet polite in others. Why is it essential to interpret other culture dialects? To avoid miscommunications in today’s society, acknowledging the way language is portrayed in different cultures will be useful prior to relationships with people of another culture. An interesting culture to explore is China because one of their basic forms of communication is nonverbal interaction. Although the act of communicating is the exchange of information between people, how interesting would it be to recognize the Chinese stance on their communication approach?
All communication is cultural because people learn how to communicate in a verbal and nonverbal manner as a child. Body language, which is an aspect of communication, is a chief part of nonverbal communication that is associated with culture. In the Chinese culture, “a substantial amount of interaction is expressed through nonverbal communication because it is part of their tradition” (dbpeds, 2010). In other words, according to the Chinese custom, the diverse type of nonverbal communication that the Chinese interact with is done with the intention that the receiver will interpret their message with complete understanding. Moreover, dbpeds (2010) state that “in China, nonverbal communication usage occurs to emphasize their social standards. The following body language are often presented to convey sentiments in China: facial express (smiling), body movement (nodding), and gesture (waving)”
Accordingly, the amicable virtue that the China populace lives by was derived from their religious doctrines and values. ”To avoid conflict, the citizens of China maintain peaceful relationships by communicating indirectly, such as refusing opposition with others, being able to interpret the...

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