Inventions Of The 1920's Essay

1711 words - 7 pages

In the 1920’s many famous inventions were brought forth that would change the world forever. Before some inventions people lived life scared. Many people purchased these new inventions to protect themselves (Guttman para 2). For example the Thompson submachine gun was purchased to protect the postal service from robbers (Guttman para 2). Another great invention that helped keep criminals off the street was the lie detector (Delaney para 2). The inventors, the reason these great inventions worked, included many average men. Some of the top inventors of the decade included: Carl Eliason, John Larson, Earle Dickson, John Taliaferro Thompson, and Alexander Fleming (All sources). These inventors worked hard to make life enjoyable and safe, and in the 1920’s many great inventions were born; some of these inventions included the television, band aid, penicillin, Thompson sub-machine gun, and many more (All Sources).
Carl Eliason came up with the snowmobile because he had a crippled foot and he could not keep up with his hunting comrades in the snow (Keillor para 2). Eliason lived in Sayner, Wisconsin where snow was very common (Keillor para 1). After Eliason made modifications to the snowmobile Eliason was able to make it to all of the hunting spots almost an hour before his hunting partners (Keillor para 7). Alexander Fleming from Scotland came up with penicillin in 1928. It was by accident that he discovered this great thing (Penicillin para 1). Fleming moved to London where he enrolled at St Mary’s Medical School, London University (Sir para 1). Fleming was interested in the bacterial action of blood and he studied it regularly. He eventually came upon the accident of what is now known as penicillin (Sir para 2). John Taliaferro Thompson was a small arms producer for the U.S. Army and he wanted to come up with a reliable automatic machine gun (Guttman para 1). Earle Dickson tried to help his wife because she was always cutting herself in the kitchen. He was an employee for Johnson and Johnson (Faw para 1).
The snowmobile was first invented when Eliason modified the Model T Ford and he put the engine on a sleigh (Keillor para 2). Eliason used all of his skills from trapping, hunting, and wood working to design the snowmobile (Keillor para 8). The inventor was only able to make 8 or 9 snowmobiles a year and none of them were the same (Keillor para 13). Bicycle chains, skis, and an engine were used to run the snowmobile. The tracks included spikes to help grip in the snow and ice (Keillor para 9). Eliason learned that the machine was too heavy and could not turn well enough to maneuver through the woods (Keillor para 4). With the snowmobile hunting was changed forever, it allowed much easier access to hard to reach places (Keillor para 7). This new idea would help anyone and everyone who traveled through the snow on a regular basis (Keillor para 1). Before the snowmobile was invented people had to use snow shoes to travel (Keillor para 12). In 1924...

Find Another Essay On Inventions of the 1920's

The Counter Culture of the 1920's

1551 words - 6 pages The counter culture of the 1920’s has affected the way the American lifestyle is today. Counter culture is a culture that primarily consists of younger people, with values and lifestyles opposing those of the original established culture. (Dictionary.com) A need for change. The 1920’s are also known as the “Jazz Age,” which was coined by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the “Roaring Twenties.” It was a decade of change. (Hakim, 41) The counterculture

Time of Revival During The 1920's

853 words - 4 pages The 1920’s were a time of revival for the country. They successfully ended World War l and rapid changes began emerging for businesses and citizens as they attempted to improve their lifestyles. The old methods prevalent in America were altering and people tried to change their regular customs. However, despite the success of the era, many began blaming their problems and hardships such as crime, death and poverty, on alcohol and the

The New Women of 1920's

1575 words - 6 pages years earlier, World War I was waging havoc, killing many men, while allowing women more freedom. The effects of World War I gave birth to the new women, also known as the Flappers, and inspiration for the 19th amendment. The flappers stirred up traditions and launched a new way of living. It soon became very apparent that the new women of the 1920’s helped redefine the social norms of society. During World War I, many men were drafted away

The 1920's

702 words - 3 pages President Calvin Coolidge once said, "The business of America is business" (Napolo 35). During the 1920's, America saw a shift toward widespread business expansion and economy prosperity. Economic expansion created new, booming businesses and thriving business profits which in turn raised the standard of living for many Americans. During this time in America, businessmen advocated a return to laissez-faire economics, less government

Inventions of the 1920s

502 words - 2 pages Inventions of the 1920’s to 30’s Through out the 1920’s many inventions were created that altered human civilization. Transportation was successfully mastered. Radio communication was becoming more common and medicine was saving more and more lives every day.      In this year Henry Ford created the first affordable, combustion engine car called the Model-T. The creation of the Model-T changed the lives of every

The Cause of the Economic Boom in the 1920's

1184 words - 5 pages The Cause of the Economic Boom in the 1920's By the end of the First World War America was regarded as the most powerful and richest country in the world. In the 1920´s the United States economy was booming. This was a period of prosperity, when the country's economy was doing well and some of the people were sharing in it. A long-term cause of the American boom in the 1920´s was America's natural advantage and regional

The Effects of Music in the 1920’s

1269 words - 6 pages After the first world war there were many changes to the way Americans lived their lives. During this time industry boomed and unemployed people now held jobs. The economy was growing, people were making money which allowed more time for leisure. In the 1920’s came a new era of music called jazz. Jazz changed writing, fashion, the way people spent their free time, it changed peoples thoughts and attitudes towards life and towards racial

Causes of the USA Boom in the 1920's

1686 words - 7 pages Causes of the USA Boom in the 1920's In the 1920’s America had a colossal boom in industry, most called this the ‘Age of Excess’. From 1921 to 1929 the USA gross national product was increased by over thirty billion dollars. This sudden change in economy occurred for a number of reasons and helped the USA gain its current title as a global superpower. The main cause for the boom in America was WW1. The allies just

The American Prohibition of Alcohol in the 1920's

698 words - 3 pages The American Prohibition of Alcohol in the 1920's The prohibition of alcohol in the United States lasted from 1920 until 1932. The movement began in the late nineteenth century, and was fueled by the formation of the Anti-Saloon League in 1893 (Why Prohibition?). This league and other anti-alcohol organizations, began to succeed in establishing local prohibition laws. By the 1920's prohibition was a national effort. The prohibition

Success of The League In The 1920's

2189 words - 9 pages Success of The League In The 1920's To determine whether the League of Nations was a success we need to know what it aimed to achieve and to what extent were they achieved. Their main aims were: -To discourage aggression between nations -To improve living and working conditions -To encourage nations to disarm -To encourage countries to cooperate, especially in business and trade The first main aim

Canada in the 1920's

1937 words - 8 pages parliament had the right to make their own decisions for themselves for all issues, domestic and foreign.During the period of 1927-1929 the first ambassador was appointed to the U.S., and also joined the league of nations. By 1929, Canada had embassies in Paris and Tokyo.In the 1920's , relations between Canada and the U.S. grew closer. Although they had been allies since 1917 (when the U.S. entered the war), trade increased between the borders, as

Similar Essays

Inventions And Discoveries Of The 1960’s

1755 words - 7 pages Inventions and Discoveries of the 1960’s The 1960’s era was a time period notorious for its technology and innovation. This particular era of time was booming with creativity. People started to venture outside of the traditional mindset established by their elders, and the new generation made a great impact on the American lifestyle. The original models of these creations have been modified into complex designs, yet as we strive for

Technology Of The 1920's Essay

1145 words - 5 pages Numerous inventions were developed in the 1920’s. Some are still used today, but others have become obsolete. Many modern-day household appliances, weapons, medications, and prepared food items had their basis in designs from this era. This technology contributed to economic prosperity and improved American lives in every conceivable way. The first major invention was the commercial radio channel. In 1920, the Pittsburgh company KDKA broadcast

Music Of The 1920's Essay

1540 words - 6 pages Megan Will Mrs. Fettig English 10B 1 March 2001         From the mournful melodies of the blues to the soulful sounds of jazz, the development of music in the 1920’s truly defined music as we know it today. The twenties, with their own glamour and pizzazz, gave music a newfound freedom to grow and prosper. America was credited as the “home of the jazz”, and names of influential American musicians were known from the Louisiana bayous to

The Automobile Revolution Of The 1920’s

1272 words - 5 pages happened at the end of the Greatest Generation (“Generation Timelines Starting with the 1920’s”; poetic_lala), the Automobile Revolution. The ‘Automobile Revolution’ massively impacted the United States, from environmental issues all the way to how people lived their everyday lives. (“1920’s”; Wikipedia) During the twenties a major technological revolution had come forth into the spotlight, Henry Ford’s assembly line. The widely acclaimed assembly line