Iranian Revolution Essay

948 words - 4 pages

Longevity and positive outcomes are what determine whether a revolution is successful or not. This is not the case for Iran. Since the revolution, Iran has been economically, politically, and socially unstable. With an economy dependent on oil, a natural source whose production is unpredictable, stability is simply unattainable. With the same leader for a long period of time, not much can change politically. Oppositions and revolts can happen and disrupt the social lives of Iranian citizens. Although the Iranian Revolution was politically successful by maintaining an Islamic Republic, the revolution was unsuccessful because of the severe economic failure it was in the long term and the ...view middle of the document...

During the Pahlavi era, education for both sexes was free. Women were admitted into universities. Women acquired the right to vote and to run for parliament. Women were allowed to participate in many areas until the revolution in 1979, which got rid of many years of progress for women’s rights. Ever since the Khomeini decade began, the theocracy with Islam principles led to women losing their rights, creating a gender bias society and therefore creating inequality. The new theocracy also, “… systematically rolled back five decades of progress in women’s rights. Women were purged from government positions. All females…were forced to observe the …Islamic dress code” (The Women's Movement). As a result of the loss of this progress, social instability occurred amongst women. Women began to fight along with the rioters, creating a larger audience against the new government. For the past three decades, women have experienced imprisonment, insults, constraints, and many have been forced to leave their homeland (Gozaar). These changes can be rooted back to Khomeini’s political speech in 1979, and the outcomes of this speech lasted for decades.

Although Khomeini succeeded in creating an Islamic Republic, this political stability was shortly lived. Khomeini, who became popular for wanting to remove Western influence from Iran, developed an Islamic Republic after the Shah lost power. Khomeini succeeded in developing Islamic norms into Iran’s government. During the revolution, Khomeini had gained many followers that supported his goals. When Khomeini died in 1989, there was a “…two-decade struggle between pragmatic forces that believed the Islamic Republic needed to evolve with the times, and revolutionary purists, led by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who believed that compromising on revolutionary ideals could unravel the entire system…”(PBS). As a result, political leaders struggled to deal with opposition and succeeding Khomeini’s goals. Like other leaders, Khomeini was opposed by, “… royalists,...

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