Is Love The Solution Or The Problem? A Midsummer Night’s Dream

563 words - 2 pages

Is love a remedy to one’s sorrow or the unfortunate reason of their unhappiness? Love is a feeling that overtakes a person when they are around something or someone they admire. It is present everywhere, in every form, in every condition and even when one least expect its. Although love is said to bring happiness to a person’s life; in the play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, it led the characters into a world of confusion and misunderstanding. Love is chaotic, unpredictable, and leads to sorrow. It is a hard concept to compromise with and if there are any misunderstandings, it could lead to a complicated and difficult life. In the play, Hermia has her heart broken by Lysander; Helena is confused about the sudden love events of her life, and Titania unfortunately falls in love with a man with a head of an ass. Therefore love is revealed as an inevitable, difficult phase of life.
In a Midsummer Night’s Dream, many different views of love are portrayed in the play. Characters fight, quarrel and are caught in the midst of arguments. Hermia, an adamant and rebellious girl is in love with Lysander. She left her home in Athens in order to stay with the one she loved and also to avoid the Athenian Law’s cruel punishments. However, their inseparable bond had a flaw. When Lysander broke Hermia’s heart and showed no interest in her anymore, it had a huge impact on the feelings of Hermia. She was filled with grief, sorrow and regret.
“What, can you do me greater harm, than hate?
Hate me? Wherefore? O me! What news, my love?
Am not I Hermia? Are not you Lysander?” (Act III, sc ii 277-279)
Hermia was hurt and...

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