Is Morality Realitive Essay

615 words - 2 pages

"It is obvious that morality is relative"Critically assess this claim.Some would argue that morality is relative. That certain acts cannot be deemed immoral as whether it is immoral or not depends on the circumstances of a situation, the culture and values of the people involved.Abortion is a good example of relative morality, is it right or wrong, this depends on the perspective of the person making the moral decision. Mackie argues that "there are no objective values" people may want to believe that there is a universal standard of what is right or wrong but that there isn't. That right and wrong don't exist.There are also the consequences of the action to take into consideration, For example if the killing to release a loved one from pain and suffering caused by a terminal illness?There are also arguments from a cultural perspective. For example I wouldn't show my bare arms or wear a short skirt in the Middle East but it is acceptable here. Therefore you could argue that morality isn't absolute it doesn't transcend cultures. That people's beliefs are different and therefore morality is relative to that.There is also an argument that one culture shouldn't force it's beliefs on another. These could be beliefs on marriage, or sex before marriage, or alchohol consumption. Social codes are different in different countries.Recently two parents who removed their child from hospital against doctors orders, were chased after and treated like criminals as they had broke a law. However they had their child's best interests at heart, they wanted him to receive a treatment that wasn't available in this country. Initially they were treated like criminals however now they have succeeded in getting the treatment they wanted for their boy in Prague. The law was in place to protect the child but it actually worked against...

Find Another Essay On is morality realitive

Essay on Light and Dark in Antigone

1188 words - 5 pages other side. As the play is carried out, the chorus is constantly changing its opinions, first believing in the actions of Creon with respect to nomos, then unsure of what to believe, and finally seeing that Antigone's actions are more consistent with the morality of the gods and the truths of physis. Light and darkness are used to support in an emotional way the action of whoever the chorus is siding with at these various stages of the play

charant Creon as the Main Character of Antigone

1231 words - 5 pages points can be used to make this argument: Creon suffers greatly, he learns a lesson, and is a tragic hero. Creon, like all main characters in Greek drama, suffers many losses and undergoes emotional pain and anguish. A target of the curse on the House of Oedipus by relation, Creon was already a victim of fate. His destiny has already been predetermined by the curse on the house of Oedipus, so he must either undergo suffering, death, or even

Free Macbeth Essays: Sleep and Sleeplessness

525 words - 2 pages done't" (2.2.12-13). These words introduce her conscience. Towards the end of the play, Lady Macbeth falls into a sleepless state, and this sleeplessness represents her guilt for her role in Duncan's death, as well as all the murders Macbeth has committed. Her conscience is trying to rid itself of the guilt by her "washing her hands" (5.1.25) of the imagined blood. Lady Macbeth's new-found conscience becomes unbearable. Thus she resolves her problems

Life Outside of Life in Hawthorne’s Wakefield

898 words - 4 pages , respectively) to demonstrate Scrooge’s and George Bailey’s significance to the lives of others. Differently, however, is the desire of Mr. Wakefield, himself, to actually step outside and beyond the boundaries of his existence to see his own significance in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story Wakefield. Furthermore, the characters of the two aforementioned works are enlightened through the importance of their actions and their lives. Wakefield is altered

Essay on Identity in Song of Solomon

2172 words - 9 pages Searching for Identity in Song of Solomon         Abstract: Whether Africans really fly or just escape a monumental burden, perhaps only through death, is a decision Toni Morrison has apparently left to her readers. Never the less, no matter what you believe, within Song of Solomon, the suggestion is, that in order to "fly" you must go back to the beginning, back to your roots. You must learn the "art" from the old messages.   O

The Character of Oedipus in Oedipus and The Infernal Machine

904 words - 4 pages mature man who, in seeing the troubles of the plague that has descended upon Thebes, feels true sorrow for his dying people and wishes to cure his moribund city. On the other hand, Cocteau's Oedipus is a pretentious, immature, and overweening young adult who seeks to indulge himself in the fast and wealthy lifestyle of the royal class. Seneca and Cocteau seem to agree that Oedipus is a very persistent, curious, and yet unwitting character

Okonkwo's Tragic Flaws in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

3121 words - 12 pages , the Igbo people, and their struggle with Anglican colonization at the turn of the century. The main character Okonkwo is forced to deal with change and transition and bears similarities essential to the tragic hero. Okonkwo is physically, politically, spiritually, and economically strong; however, these strengths combined with his emotional insecurities force him into a tragic downfall, much like that of the classic Greek Heroes. In typical

Sophocles' Antigone - Antigone Must Challenge Creon

889 words - 4 pages their recent civil war, also must rally the patriotism of his people. While he, too, praises the loyalty of his people, he does two other things to rally the citizens: he emphasizes his own qualifications for leadership, and he reminds them what happens to traitors.     Creon speaks to his people at the beginning of Antigone because he is now the only ruler of Thebes, and he wants them to be loyal to him. He knows there's a chance they might

The Role of Women in Homer’s Iliad

796 words - 3 pages The Role of Women in Homer’s Iliad Homer’s Iliad is undoubtedly focused on its male characters: Achilles, primarily, but also Hector and Agamemnon. Nevertheless, it seems that the most crucial characters in the epic are female. Homer uses the characters of Thetis, Andromache, and Helen as a basis for comparison to the male characters. Homer wants his audience to see and understand the folly of his male characters in choosing war over peace

A Comparison of Butler's Life and Kindred

1915 words - 8 pages A Comparison of Butler's Life and Kindred   What lies in the mind of an author as he or she begins the long task of writing a fiction novel? This question can be answered if the author's life is studied and then compared to the work itself. Octavia E. Butler's life and her novel Kindred have remarkable comparisons. This essay will point out important events of Butler's life and how they link to the mentioned novel. Octavia Estelle

Pillars of Metaphorical Ambiguity in The Scarlet Letter

1439 words - 6 pages Pillars of Metaphorical Ambiguity in The Scarlet Letter Among the multiplicity of arcane elements hidden beneath the words in Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter", none is so apparent, yet strikingly subtle to the reader's perception and consumption of characterization than the allegorical play on words within the names of the characters.  Both the protagonist and her rival within the plot are blessed with conveniently appropriate, fitting

Similar Essays

Is Morality Realitive Essay

615 words - 2 pages "It is obvious that morality is relative"Critically assess this claim.Some would argue that morality is relative. That certain acts cannot be deemed immoral as whether it is immoral or not depends on the circumstances of a situation, the culture and values of the people involved.Abortion is a good example of relative morality, is it right or wrong, this depends on the perspective of the person making the moral decision. Mackie argues that "there

Reality And Illusion In Shakespeare's Hamlet Reality, Appearance And Deception

896 words - 4 pages Reality and Illusion in Hamlet   Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet, begins with the appearance of a ghost, an apparition, possibly a hallucination. Thus, from the beginning, Shakespeare presents the air of uncertainty, of the unnatural, which drives the action of the play and develops in the protagonist as a struggle to clarify what only seems to be absolute and what is actually reality. Hamlet's mind, therefore, becomes the central force of the

Sub Plots In Hamlet Essay

1118 words - 4 pages Sub-plots in Hamlet   There are many things that critics say make Hamlet a "Great Work," one of which is the way that Shakespeare masterfully incorporates so many sub-plots into the story, and ties them all into the main plot of Hamlet’s revenge of his father’s murder. By the end of Act I, not only is the main plot identified, but many other sub-plots are introduced. Among the sub-plots are trust in the Ghost of King Hamlet, Fortinbras

Hamlet As Victim And Hero Essay

1301 words - 5 pages human weaknesses and correct the wrongs created by his uncle.   The soliloquy selected to describe the emotions of Hamlet, after discovering the evil doings of his uncle, is found within the lines one hundred twenty-nine to one hundred fifty-nine (Hamlet Prince 71). Hamlet's first reaction was to look for a way out, which would be a common response for several humans if they were placed in that situation. He wished for death and questioned