Isolation And Alienation In Today's Society Evident In Of Mice And Men

898 words - 4 pages

There is no hiding the provocative use of isolation in the novel Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Isolationism can be defined as a policy of remaining apart from the affairs or interests of other groups. Steinbeck uses people of different race, sex, and mental capabilities to uncover the isolation and alienation society throws down upon people who are different. Lennie, a main character in the novel, is mentally handicapped and must obey George in order to make a living. Lenny is a large man and an excellent worker, but due to his mental deficiency, he is isolated from the rest of the workers on the ranch. The incorporation of isolation and alienation in the book Of Mice and Men by John ...view middle of the document...

As the book progresses, it becomes evident that Lennie is actually a better than average labor worker just because of his pure size and lack of bad attitude. Throughout the book Steinbeck continuously uses the use of small soft animals to show how nice and caring Lennie is. The animals are also strategically used as foreshadowing to what Lennie’s big stature was actually capable of. Although Lennie proves that he can be considered one of the best assets on the farm, the men still alienate him due to his being “dumb”. Lennie’s mental deficiency has held him back from many activities and has also got him into a decent amount of trouble. The men on the farm do not look at Lennie for his hard work and dedication, they look at him and they see a big goofy guy that still acts like a six year old. This example of alienation is probably one of the most prevalent examples of being alienated today because society still looks at people with deficiencies and just stare and act like they are not there. It’s bad enough to know that society still feels the need to go out of their way to embarrass a person who has something wrong with them, but it is not just because of mental abilities. Another immense reason for alienation is the difference of race in society today.
There is no question that racism has been a problem in this country for hundreds of years, and continues to be one of the biggest problems of today’s era. Many people of black or other races are much more...

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