It's The Comparison Of Greek & Roman Cultures In The Storeis Of Medea & The Aeneid.

600 words - 2 pages

Greeks Verses RomansI thought that both of these stories were very interesting to read. The Greeks and Romans had similarities and differences in their cultures. I will discuss the similarities and differences of their cultures, and the stories of Medea and Aeneid.Both the Roman and the Greeks respected and feared their gods. Romans preferred war. It was in their nature to fight. They were raised to battle. Romans were not well rounded; their main or only study growing up was physical training and military science. Aeneas was very much Roman in this way. Aeneas was very skilled on the battlefield. Greek heroes were well rounded. Greeks would study music, dancing, rhetoric, philosophy, mathematics, physical training, and military science. Studying rhetoric, philosophy, and mathematics made Greeks more useful citizens. The Greeks two main beliefs were: know thyself, and nothing in excess. Roman heroes were considered great because of their achievements on the battlefield. Unlike a Greek hero, a Roman hero could not be overcome by emotion or lack of self-control. Aeneas lost his best friend, Pallas, during the war to the enemy, Turnus. However, he was not overcome by thoughts of revenge as he continued fighting.Roman spirit was the major influence of the Aeneid. Unlike the Greek heroes, Aeneas did not let is emotions interfere with his goals. This trait helped him to accomplish his goal even though Aeneas did not get to see Rome after all his sacrifices. Virgil's goal in writing the Aeneid is to present Aeneas as a pious individual, and thus giving Rome a glorious founding. By closing the novel with an act of rage, however, Virgil portrays Aeneas as a ruthless killer. The ending is inappropriate because it casts...

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