It's Time To Reconsider America's Right To Bear Arms

1297 words - 5 pages

Imagine a world in which humans weren’t forced to stoop to a criminal’s level in order to feel safe, a world in which arguments were settled with words, and power came from the mind and not a weapon. Imagine a world without guns. Unfortunately in the United States, this world has become unattainable, but stricter legislation on handguns would bring this ideal world one step closer. The handgun statistics in America speak for themselves. After comparing America’s statistics to those in other countries with stricter handgun legislation, it becomes clear that something must be done to fix the broken American system. In America, guns are too readily available to the public and the result is an overwhelming amount of deaths. Under the current legislation, America is not only losing countless lives, but also a shocking amount of money. And so, as one study’s the true toll the current interpretation of the Second Amendment is taking on our country, one should stop and think if granting so liberally the right to bear arms is really in the best interest of the country.
According to one study, in 2005 nearly 40,000 people died due to firearms in the United States. To compare, less American’s died in the Korean War. The same study indicates that in the United States, there were 11, 344 handgun murders. Many gun advocates suggest this number is incomparable to the number of American lives protected by handguns, but in 2006 there were only 154 justified homicides involving handguns (Statistics). In fact results from a University of Pennsylvania study show that individuals in possession of a gun were actually more likely to be shot (Branas et all).
When compared to the statistics in countries with stricter handgun laws, America’s numbers are overwhelming. One study shows firearms killed 56 people in Australia, 184 in Canada, 37 in Sweden, and 5 in New Zealand (Statistics). The number of handgun homicides of these countries combined doesn’t come close to equaling the 11, 334 in America.
The firearm laws in England could be used as an example for bettering America’s legislation. England has one of the lowest handgun casualty statistics in the world. One source argues that this low rate of handgun homicide is due to England’s strict firearms legislation. For instance, law in England is the requirement of justification of every firearm purchased. Under this law, the number of firearms possessed by citizens is limited and police use their own judgment on which people can be trusted with firearms. Citizens must have legitimate sporting or work-related reasons for owning a gun. In England, self- defense is not considered a legitimate reason for handgun ownership. The procedure of acquiring a handgun in England involves a thorough background check, interviews with two people the applicant has known for at least two years, and the approval from a family doctor. Additionally, an applicant must keep the gun in safe storage strictly mandated and...

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