The Role Of Women In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

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Why is it that that different cultures all around the world all choose to neglect the women in their society, of equality, when their population is equal to the male population? It has been proven that women are more likely to live in poverty, likely to be live without an education, and live with other barriers because of their gender. Various cultures and societies create these other barriers under the influence of a patriarchal society, which asserts the beliefs of male dominance and authority over women. Aldous Huxley’s novel, Brave New World, introduces the reader to an “ideal” society set in the future, 632 years after Ford’s death. The society is controlled by a World State that asserts its beliefs through hypnopaedia conditioning. The feminist theory is a type of criticism that analyzes the ideologies of a patriarchal social system within various texts. This essay will strive to prove that one major theme within this novel is that females simply exist as possessions to be controlled. The feminist theory can be used as a lens to examine this central them by relating it to the concepts of patriarchy, gender binaries, and suppression of women.
Females only exist for the sole purpose of being controllable possessions and this is easy to see in the way that patriarchy influences the societies in the novel. In chapter 3, Fanny reminds Lenina of a hypnopaedia message they learnt through their conditioning, “Lenina shook her head. ’Somehow’, she mused,’ I hadn’t been feeling very keen on promiscuity lately. There are times when one doesn’t. Haven’t you found that too, Fanny?’ Fanny nodded her sympathy and understanding. ‘But one’s got to make the effort,’ she said sententiously, ’one’s got to play the game. After all, everyone belongs to everyone else.’ (Huxley, 36-37). Patriarchy is a social system that supports male dominance and authority over women. If the women in this society weren’t...

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