The Role Of Women In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

654 words - 3 pages

Why is it that that different cultures all around the world all choose to neglect the women in their society, of equality, when their population is equal to the male population? It has been proven that women are more likely to live in poverty, likely to be live without an education, and live with other barriers because of their gender. Various cultures and societies create these other barriers under the influence of a patriarchal society, which asserts the beliefs of male dominance and authority over women. Aldous Huxley’s novel, Brave New World, introduces the reader to an “ideal” society set in the future, 632 years after Ford’s death. The society is controlled by a World State that asserts its beliefs through hypnopaedia conditioning. The feminist theory is a type of criticism that analyzes the ideologies of a patriarchal social system within various texts. This essay will strive to prove that one major theme within this novel is that females simply exist as possessions to be controlled. The feminist theory can be used as a lens to examine this central them by relating it to the concepts of patriarchy, gender binaries, and suppression of women.
Females only exist for the sole purpose of being controllable possessions and this is easy to see in the way that patriarchy influences the societies in the novel. In chapter 3, Fanny reminds Lenina of a hypnopaedia message they learnt through their conditioning, “Lenina shook her head. ’Somehow’, she mused,’ I hadn’t been feeling very keen on promiscuity lately. There are times when one doesn’t. Haven’t you found that too, Fanny?’ Fanny nodded her sympathy and understanding. ‘But one’s got to make the effort,’ she said sententiously, ’one’s got to play the game. After all, everyone belongs to everyone else.’ (Huxley, 36-37). Patriarchy is a social system that supports male dominance and authority over women. If the women in this society weren’t...

Find Another Essay On The Role of Women in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

The Dystopian Society of Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

1416 words - 6 pages A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a

The Loss of Individuality in the Strive for Power: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1620 words - 6 pages The love of Power and its grasp on humanity is exemplified in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. In Huxley’s dystopian society, access to power is limited; it is allowed only to those who have been conditioned to gain it. "We also predestine and condition. We decant our babies as socialized human beings, as Alphas or Epsilons, as future sewage workers or […] future Directors of Hatcheries." Power in Brave New World initiates from eliminating

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1535 words - 7 pages Theme or Concept Examined in Brave New World Huxley observes in his work, Brave New World that the modern world revolves around technological development. The aspirations and morals of modern society do not entirely rely on social issues such as love, family, and success but rather on industrial progress and social development. According to Huxley, technological improvement and growth are critical factors that shape the operation and activities

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1472 words - 6 pages vomit. In two short hours, the stability of America’s foundation became questionable. I wondered how such a terrorist attack could happen in this society. Then I began looking for warning signs. Ironically, all the warning America needed lies underneath the cover of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World published in 1932. Huxley warned America prior to World War II and almost 70 years prior to the “Attack on America” that materialism, ethnocentrism

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1128 words - 5 pages How valuable is the protection of individuality? In a society dominated by falsified, scientifically manufactured happiness, individuality proves a rarity. Aldous Huxley’s speculative novel, Brave New World, demonstrates the consequences of this type of impassive society. Bernard, Helmholtz, and John are all unique from their peers, and they think individually as a result. Because of their individuality, the group is ultimately banned from

The Use of Technology to Control Society in Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

1468 words - 6 pages an intriguing concept. Brave New World’s World State is in control of the reproduction of people by intervening medically. The Hatchery and Conditioning Centre is the factory that produces human beings. Ovaries are surgically removed, fertilized and then fetuses are kept incubated in specifically designed bottles. There are five castes which include: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Each caste is destined to have a different role; for

"Brave New World" Aldous Huxley.

636 words - 3 pages Drug abuse is a growing problem in today's world, while in Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, the use of soma is encouraged and is distributed by the government as a tool for control. Drug abuse causes social and psychological dilemmas for the user and those in contact with the user. Huxley's world abuses these problems to keep people in order.A person can become dependent of a drug psychologically and physically (Musto). This can often lead to

The Funhouse Mirror: an Examination of Distortion of Government in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

585 words - 2 pages O'Connor states (correctly, might I add) "[distortion] is the only way to make people see". Writing about what already is is not nearly as effective as writing about what could be. This is just what Huxley does in Brave New World: he provides us with an image of what the world of the future could be like, a distorted image of his own world from the early 1930s. The Great Depression had global effects, and although Huxley was not American

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

771 words - 3 pages In the "Brave New World" of 632 A. F. (After Ford), universal human happiness has been achieved. (Well, almost.) Control of reproduction, genetic engineering, conditioning--especially via repetitive messages delivered during sleep--and a perfect pleasure drug called "Soma" are the cornerstones of the new society. Reproduction has been removed from the womb and placed on the conveyor belt, where reproductive workers

The Use Of Distortion in brave "New World" by Aldous Huxley

683 words - 3 pages Aldous Huxley, in his distopian novel,- Brave New World , written in 1932 presents ahorrifying view of a possible future in which society has become a prisoner of the verytechnology it hoped would save us. In -Brave New World Huxley's distortion oftechnology, religion, and family values, is much more effective than his use of literaryrealism found in his depiction of a savage reservation. Through his use of distortionHuxley tells a classic tale

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley - In many ways, John's presence in the "Brave New World" is very antagonistic.

1038 words - 4 pages Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" is a science fiction novel about a society conditioned to believe in certain things and to act certain ways. They are taught prejudices against other types of people, they are taught to dislike and to fear nature, and furthermore, are conditioned to take a drug - soma - when things are going badly, in order to keep them in a positive, happy and comfortable state all the time. Many can argue that this World State

Similar Essays

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World And Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451

2393 words - 10 pages Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 Both Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 portray hedonistic societies. The inhabitants of both societies seek to enjoy themselves for as much of the time as possible, however only citizens in Brave New World are truly happy. This leads to the conclusion that humans can never be truly happy, according to the authors, as their natural selves

Overview Of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1543 words - 6 pages experiences in Italy under the reign of fascist leader Benito Mussolini (Barron's Educational Series). Huxley was deeply troubled by threats to individual freedom and independence; in Europe in the 1920’s and early 1930’s, these were threatened by the rise of totalitarian governments (Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World Historical Context). Huxley envisions the birth of a scientific dictatorship, which slowly exorcises individuality out of

Happiness In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

708 words - 3 pages When we look to define happiness, many different ideas come to mind. Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary uses three definitions for happiness: good fortune, a state of well being and contentment, and a pleasurable satisfaction. In Brave New World, Aldus Huxley argues that a society can redefine happiness through the government’s manipulation of the environment and the human mind itself. The government accomplishes this by mind

"The Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley.

961 words - 4 pages This is just a : Do you want to live in this world essay.The Brave New WorldIn The Brave New World, their society is unique compared to the reality that I live in. They may have many advantages and disadvantages if it is compared to our society. Brave New World's utopia would be nice to have in our society. Having to place myself in their world would never happen. I do not think living in the utopia of brave new world would suit me.Living in