Jack The Egomaniac In William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1281 words - 5 pages

Having an individual take control over a group is inevitable. Adolf Hitler took over Germany; at first he was appointed as chancellor but the Germans’ let him get away with taking over as dictator (Truemen , 2013). It was out of fear that the Germans’ let him be in power. In Lord of the Flies, William Golding utilizes Jack as the most important character in the novel because of how his psychological personality affects the plot. Jack, much like Hitler, gains control by instilling fear into the others and takes over as leader. Throughout the whole book Golding continues to use Jack to twist the story. He stands in the way of the other boys’ success in getting off of the island. Jack is motivated by his id and seeks authority at all costs, illuminating that the desire for power can eventually undermine and hide the goodness in an individual.
An id is not concerned with how his decision affects others; he just wants what he wants. Jack Merridew is a prime example of a character motivated by his id. Jack was just an innocent twelve year old, was lead chorister boy and could sing a C note. Coming from an organized society, he has rules instilled in him. Life for him and the others change dramatically on the island. His innocence is lost when he stops governing his conduct. Merridew is not granted power but realizes that he can attain it by returning to his primitive behavior. “[Jack] tried to covey the compulsion to track down and kill that was swallowing him up […] we want meat” (46). At this point in the novel, he dispels his primitive behavior that hints at his lust for killing. His selfish ways as an id indicate that he wants to do what he desires. At the beginning of the story he is only concerned with his pride so his goal in the first few chapters is to kill the pig and ignore the things Ralph asks him to do. Jack becomes so fixated on killing the pig that Golding refers to “the madness [coming] into his eyes again” each time the pig is mentioned (46). Jack continuously paints a picture of his main goal in the beginning to make it clear that he is not a coward and is capable of murder. Jack continues to make excuses by saying, “I thought I might kill […] But I shall! Next time! […] We wounded the pig and the spear fell out […]” (46). Jack becomes fixated with the fact that he showed weakness when he couldn’t kill the pig, he tries to cover it up and acts like the pig got lucky. After he kills his first pig he brags about it by saying that he really was capable of killing. “I cut the pig’s throat” to prove to the other boys that he really was capable of killing (64). This all demonstrates the beginning of his moral decline; from a hunter who brought various leadership qualities to the group. Becoming primitive helps him to overpower Ralph and form his own group.
By excessively abusing his power and forming his own group to control, Jack clarifies that he is the id. Jack enjoys giving orders such as: “Give me a drink.”(138), “SamnEric, Get me a...

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