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Jacksonian Democrats, Dbq, Explains The Positives Of The Jacksonian Influence

1109 words - 4 pages

Supporters of President Jackson, Jacksonian Democrats, saw themselves as protectors of the United States Constitution, political democracy, individual liberty, and equality within economic opportunity. The ideas possessed by the Jackson supporters was nothing short of true.The Jacksonians were firmly entrenched behind the "humblest citizens". They believed in making the country better for the common man. With this, Jackson set out to get all of these common men involved in the government through rallies and eliminating the requirements to vote. Jackson made the people believe that the common man's ballot would offset the votes of the economic elites [Doc.A]. Upholding the belief that no man was better then any other , thus holding up the Constitution , Jacksonians set up a policy of rotation in office. It was believed that since all men were equal, all men could hold public office. However, this was one of the Jacksonians weaker points. Although they claimed it was "The Age of the Common Man" power actually remained with the elites who Jackson had appointed. Jacksonians claimed to support a level playing field, with all men able to hold office, but they banked on the unequal results when only 1/5 of Jackson's appointed officers were removed. Jackson also supported industrialization and the scramble for material wealth. The Jacksonians were responsible for the Panic of 1837 in this manner, because of their attempt to democratize economic opportunity and political participation. Ever protecting the constitution, the Jacksonian Era saw abolishment of all state churches, in an effort to make religion more democratic in the United States. In general, the Jacksonians did an outstanding job of democratizing the country as far as outsiders were concerned. Harriet Martineau, a British author, was astonished by the knowledge and lack of poverty established by the Jacksonians. Martineau was astonished by how intelligent and well adjusted the common man actually was and was pleasantly surprised, to say the least, by her visit to America [Doc.D].The name Nicholas Biddle was a curse, in the eyes of any Jacksonian and he was "affectionately" referred to as "Czar Nicholas" in many Jacksonian debates. Nicholas Biddle headed the Second Bank of the United States ,the number one hatred of Jacksonian Democrats nation wide. Jackson's followers were supported in their hatred of the bank by westerners, who preferred the easier credit of state banks, debtors, who considered the National Bank a monopoly, and the states rights activists, who believed the Bank unconstitutional. This was all right up Jackson's proverbial alley. Biddle attempted to get a recharter for his Bank in 1832 (four years before it was necessary). Jackson vetoed his bill on the count of "privilege of banking....(being) a monopoly of the foreign and domestic exchange."[Doc.B] Jackson stepped further onto his presidential soap box declaring, "...the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of...

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