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Jacobson Vs. United States Supreme Court

801 words - 4 pages

Late in the evening on the night of February 22nd 1984, Keith Jacobson ordered two explicit magazines for his personal leisure. These two publications ordered were titled "Bare Boys 1" and "Bare Boys 2" from a California based adult novelty shop. Keith Jacobson claims is that he did not know that these two publications included pre-teen nudity of young boys which violated the provision of the Child Protection Act of 1984. Only ninety days after Jacobson received the illegally explicit magazines the law banned all types of pornography of underage children. What interests me the most of this Supreme Court Decision was the government originated entrapment that ultimately decided Jacobson's ...view middle of the document...

The main issue in this Supreme Court decision that caught many peoples attention including my self includes many factors that seem unjustified. The time Jacobson purchased the magazines they were legal. The government intended for Jacobson to fall into many different counterfeit organizations to trap him into shame. For the jury the question they were faced with was whether Jacobson willingly committed himself into an illegal activity, or was he unlawfully tricked by the Government's sting operation.From the Governments point of view, Jacobson's indictment does not include Jacobson's personal psychological fantasies, yet rather that act of physically willing to break the law as he attempted to receive the illegal material of minors. For the ones who oppose the indictment, their decision was made with the design that Keith Jacobson was the unwary citizen. Who also believe that Jacobson may have not even ordered the illegal material if he was not exposed to the opportunity as often as the fabricated mailings were received at Jacobson's residence.Due to the Supreme Court hearing taking effect in the early nineties, the idea of a homosexual was not nearly as open or accepted in society as today's standard of an ideological acceptance. Keith Jacobson had a great disadvantage....

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