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Jane Eyre Response Essay

878 words - 4 pages

This passage vividly displays Jane's emotional desolation at how Rochester has lied to her. Jane “would not ascribe vice to him” or “say he had betrayed her” yet perceives that surely he could not have had “real affection” for her if he intended to trick her into a bigamous marriage that impeached her religious morals and stopped her from achieving the independence she had fought so long to achieve. In this passage Jane is able to recognize her only option is to leave Thornfield and remove herself from Rochester.

Jane can no longer become independent as a Governess or married woman at Thornfield; her “hopes [are] all dead” and her “prospects [are] desolate”. As a woman growing up in the ...view middle of the document...

Jane was attracted to Rochester's black and brilliant eyes, which symbolized his temper and power. Looking back Jane cannot believe “how blind (her eyes) had been”. This becomes a complete role reversal when Jane returns to Rochester after he loses his eyesight and then Jane becomes his eyes. This is also a great paradox as Rochester must lose his eyesight to see the error of his ways that attempting to trick Jane into bigamy was morally and ethically wrong.
The rapid change of the woods is a metaphor for Jane's state of mind. “Twelve hours since” when Jane had been a happy and expectant bride to be; the woods “waved leafy and fragrant as groves between the tropics” had been “spread, waste [and] wild” as her “hopes were all dead”. The passion between Jane and Rochester had been nurtured and grown under the trees when they were walking together in the orchard and woods, and also when Rochester proposes to Jane in the leafy enclosure underneath the chestnut tree. Jane is then forced to escape from, and returns to, Thornfield through the woods, and heads to Ferndean Manor where she is reunited and eventually marries Rochester. In this way the woods map Jane's growth in independence and state of mind as they provide her the chance to escape from the oppressive forces in Rochester and give her the opportunity to return to Rochester once she has achieved her intellectual and social sovereignty.

The powerful metaphor of a great river represents Jane's life...

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