Jane Eyre Struggle For Love

994 words - 4 pages

The overriding theme of "Jane Eyre," is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance through the five settings in which she lives: Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Moor House, and Ferndean. Through these viewpoints, the maturation and self-recognition of Jane becomes evident, as well as traceable. It is not until Jane flees from Rochester and Thornfield, and spends time at Moor House, that her maturation to womanhood is complete. At this point, Jane is able to finally return to Rochester as an independent woman, fully aware of her desire to love, as well as to be loved.From the onset of the novel, we see the world through the eyes of Jane; a strong character who wishes to overcome her birth rite as an orphan in Victorian times. From this viewpoint, we are able to trace how Jane progresses in her struggle for individuality, as well as for love. At Gateshead, it becomes apparent that Jane is terrifically self-willed and possessive of a fiery temper. An example of this is when Jane stands up to her aunt saying, "You think I have no feelings, and that I can do without one bit of love or kindness, but I cannot live so: and you have no pity" (Bronte, 68). Here, Jane makes her first declaration of independence, contending that she will no longer be a secondary member in the Reed household. At Lowood, Jane is repulsed by Mr. Blocklehurst and his "two-faced" character and coarseness.However, while at Lowood, Jane finds her first true friend in the form of Helen Burns, another student at the school. Helen teaches Jane of love in the form of religion. By means of instruction as well as by example, Helen is able to convey this message. When Jane is punished in front of the whole school, she tries to accept it as though it has some higher purpose. However, Jane still desires human affection and is deeply hurt when she is scorned. Jane goes as far as to say, "If others don't love me, I would rather die than live." Helen's response, "You think too much of the love of human beings," is a testament to her devout faith (Bronte, 101). When Helen is dying of Typhus later on in the story, she reminds Jane, "I believe: I have faith: I am going to God" (Bronte, 113). Jane is able to draw strength from Helen's faith, ultimately making her (Jane) stronger. Jane's faith in a higher purpose is what guides her through her turbulent life to finally achieve happiness.When Jane finally leaves Lowood for Thornfield, she is both older and wiser for her experiences and yet, she is still unfulfilled. Pursuing a new position as a governess, Jane hopes that her new life will fill that void. At first, Jane is bored by her work, wanting something more out of life. When Jane finally meets Rochester, his presence totally transforms her life, filling the void. For once, a man sincerely pays attention to...

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