Japan’s Opening To The West: Westerners Accounts Of The Secret Country

3476 words - 14 pages

1Japan's Opening to the West: Westerners Accounts of The Secret Country Japan was one of the most secretive countries in the world for hundreds of years because of rules put in place by their government during the 15th-17th centuries. When men such as Matthew Perry, Francis Ottiwell Adams, and Townsend Harris traveled to Japan, they were astounded and surprised by what they experienced and saw, but none of them had anything bad to say about the people or culture that they encountered in their travels. The heritage and culture were just something that was not very common in the Western world. All three men kept detailed journals that demonstrate they were not familiarized with some of the things that the Japanese culture entailed. In their respective journals, Perry noticed that the way they dressed was far different than Western society. Perry, Adams, and Harris all had one thing in common when they arrived in Japan at their respective times; they brought a culture and a way of life that the citizens of the country had never seen before. It was as much of a shock for the Westerners who entered this foreign, unknown territory as it was for the native citizens of Japan who had never experienced people from other countries entering their walls and learning their way of life. There were specific characteristics of Japanese culture that all three men described in their personal journals, and their accounts gave Westerners a better idea of what life was like on a daily basis in the newly opened country.Perry reestablished for the first time in over 200 years regular trade and discourse between Japan and Western countries. From the beginning, it is clear that one of his interests/concerns was gauging possible military opposition. Because Japan was such an unknown, no one knew if they possessed a strong military within the country. Harris was surprised by some of their mannerisms and behaviors that would be considered uncommon in the West. Adams focused primarily on the Japanese education system, and he noted many characteristics that were not seen in Western schools at that time. Their mannerisms, dress, and education system were just a few of things that Westerners were not accustomed to, but it gave them insight on how another part of the world lived and operated on a daily basis. Had it not been for a Japanese policy put in place in the 1600s by the Tokugawa regime, Westerners would have entered Japan and learned about their people, culture, and society much sooner than they actually did.After persistent attempts by the Europeans to convert the Japanese to Catholicism Japan developed a foreign relations policy called sakoku under which no foreigner could enter the country, and no Japanese citizen could leave the country. The punishment for either offense was death, which proved to be an effective means of keeping foreigners out and natives within the country. Sakoku was first enacted in 1633 under the Tokugawa shogunate, which was the feudal military...

Find Another Essay On Japan’s Opening to the West: Westerners Accounts of The Secret Country

Effectiveness of the Opening Chapter to Great Expectations

1095 words - 4 pages with the convict a secret? Will he do what he has ordered him to do? How will their relationship develop? Dickens uses a variety of methods and techniques effectively, the reader is immediately drawn in. The techniques Dickens uses grab the readers attention and encites them to continue reading the rest of the novel.

the secret of colors Essay

1487 words - 6 pages Certain animals are treated with care and respect, while others are treated as if they were just a pebble. This is because animals like elephants are sentient, while animals like rats are not. But ironically, they have the same intelligence. This is just like the racism occurring in the book, The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd. 1964 was not a good timeline to the black people. People were no more than sheep, treated differently because

The Secret of “I”

1201 words - 5 pages access to further research. Simultaneously, however, Rand had symbolism in mind whilst creating this scene. While reveling in his invention, Equality declares, “Our discovery is too great for us to waste our time in sweeping the streets. We must not keep our secret to ourselves…We must bring it into the sight of all men” (60). Because of his work, Equality experiences the pride of working alone and notices the strength and capability of his own

The Secret of Forever

1847 words - 8 pages On no account or rather on very few accounts has anyone ever loved the idea of growing old, or rather no one wants to age past their twenties, even though it is a natural part of living, with age there is the fear of becoming decrepit and forgetful, then to lose all self-control and die. Growing older has become a more frightful aspect of becoming grey haired and filled with wrinkles and skin blotches. Juan Ponce de Leon, a Spanish explorer

The Secret of Outliers

1182 words - 5 pages than what is required, and has to be talented. Talent alone is not enough to become the world’s next billionaire. Talent, preparation, opportunity, and connections are needed to become an outlier. In the book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell shows just how equally important luck and opportunity is to having talent. Gladwell emphasizes throughout the book that one of the keys to being successful is being born at the right time. When Gladwell is talking

Accounts of Eros in the Plato's "Symposium"

1797 words - 7 pages nights ago. It is customary to drink much wine at these gatherings, however, every one present is too weak from the night before. (Nehamas & Woodruff, pg. xiii) So a proposition is made, by Phaedrus, to properly give praise to the god Eros, and speak on the topic of love. It was their opinion that no poet has yet been able to properly do so. (Nehamas & Woodruff, pg. 7) There were a total of seven accounts given in praise of eros, by seven

Compare the accounts of two major supermarkets

3287 words - 13 pages Introduction to ReportThe attached report will analyse and compare the financial status of two UK supermarkets, Morrisons plc and Somerfield plc, for a potential investor who wishes to become a minor shareholder in one of the two company's. To perform this investigation the 2002 financial accounts of both company's have been used, this information will also include the financial data from the 2001 period, for further comparison between years

The Accounts of August Baier: A Biography

951 words - 4 pages “In all of us there is a hunger, marrow deep, to know our heritage - to know who we are and where we came from. Without this enriching knowledge, there is a hollow yearning. No matter what our attainments in life, there is still a vacuum, emptiness, and the most disquieting loneliness.” These words of Alex Haley truly expressed to me personally the imperative need and importance of my family history and heritage. As I believe, family is a gift

The Similarities and Differences Between the Views of the Chinese, the Japanese, and the Westerners on the Rape of Nanking

3886 words - 16 pages their will to fight." . Other sources plainly suggest that the Japanese soldiers were "out of control" or they had a "complete disregard for life" .Was the slaughter of civilians planned?It was "said by Westerners... [that] there were widespread accounts of civilians being hacked to death" John Rabe, a German missionary, wrote in his diary that many civilians were killed without reason. He once witnessed the sight of seeing innocent workers being led

The Opening of Glass Menagerie

899 words - 4 pages afternoon in Blue Mountain…” This happened throughout the play consistently. She would talk about her life in the “Blue Mountain” whenever she got a chance to. So it would be quite true to say that Amanda was living in her memory, which caused her to deny the reality. The idea of accepting the reality was also evident in the opening of the play. Tom spoke of gentleman caller who “is the most realistic character in the play” then

the secret to cell immortality

677 words - 3 pages it reaches senescence, known as cell death. In Chapter 27 “The Secret to Immortality” of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Rebecca Skloot provided an explanation to why HeLa cells were “immortal” unlike other mortal cancer cells; the p53 tumor suppressor gene had been “turned off” by the Human Papilloma Virus Lacks had. She mentions how according to the Hayflick Limit, human cell’s were able to replicate an average of fifty times. In addition

Similar Essays

Japan’s Opening To The West: Westerners Accounts Of The Secret Country

3476 words - 14 pages 1Japan's Opening to the West: Westerners Accounts of The Secret Country Japan was one of the most secretive countries in the world for hundreds of years because of rules put in place by their government during the 15th-17th centuries. When men such as Matthew Perry, Francis Ottiwell Adams, and Townsend Harris traveled to Japan, they were astounded and surprised by what they experienced and saw, but none of them had anything bad to say about the

The Fall Of The Roman Empire Explains The Fate Of Rome In The West In The Course Of The 3rd To 5th Centuries Ad. Accounts For The Role Of Christianity For Both The Roman West And East

1172 words - 5 pages Did the Roman Empire really fall? What would later be known as the Byzantine Empire wasn't just an extension of the Roman Empire; it was part of the empire itself that flourished for nearly another millennia. The Western Roman Empire simply declined into a state of existence that made it vulnerable to invaders and was eventually overran by barbarian tribes. Rome had essentially been declining since 180 AD when civil wars occurred up until 285 AD

The Secret To Power Essay

903 words - 4 pages Jazmine Knight Ms.Deitz English IV 11 April 2014 The Secret to Power In December 1917 the cheka became the grave diggers of all who opposes the communist party's will during the Russian Revolution. Originally established as a temporary institutions to be abolished once Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks had consolidated their power, they soon acquired powers of summary justice and began a campaign of terror against the propertied classes

Warning To The West Essay

846 words - 4 pages Warning to the West is a criticism of both the west and his own nation. Solzhenitsyn expresses his deep pain and frustration toward the nations of the world for ignoring the atrocities and even aiding the Soviet Communist Government in which he hails from. Solzhenitsyn expresses his slanted view of a perfect Détente and what he feels should be a true Marxist state by showing some of the atrocities claimed by the Soviet regime. He expresses to