Jay Gatsby Is A Sympathetic Character In Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby

600 words - 2 pages

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby provides the reader with a unique outlook on the life of the newly rich. Gatsby is an enigma and a subject of great curiosity, furthermore, he is content with a lot in life until he strives too hard. His obsession with wealth, his lonely life and his delusion allow the reader to sympathize with him.
Initially, Gatsby stirs up sympathetic feelings because of his obsession with wealth. Ever since meeting Dan Cody, his fascination for wealth has increased dramatically. He even uses illegal unmoral methods to obtain hefty amounts of wealth to spend on buying a house with “ Marie Antoinette music-rooms, Restoration Salons, dressing rooms and poolrooms, and bath rooms with sunken baths.” (88) His wardrobe is just as sensational with “ shirts of sheer linen and thick silk and fine fennel.” (89) Gatsby buys such posh items to impress Daisy but to him, Daisy herself is a symbol of wealth. Jay remarks, “[Daisy’s] voice is full of money.” (115). For him, Daisy is the one who is “ High in a white palace the king’s daughter, the golden girl.”(115)Gatsby is willing to risk anything for Daisy because she is the missing item that would make his “wealthy image” complete. Ultimately, it is his obsession with wealth that leads to his tragic end.
Secondly, the reason of the readers’ sympathy is Gatsby’s loneliness. Gatsby is perpetually enveloped by solitude. Despite the “Hotel de Ville” (11)mansion, the car and the luxuries that would overwhelm most people, Jay finds no sense of belonging amongst those objects. “ Gatsby, standing alone on the marble steps and looking from one group to another” (51) does not mingle with his guests. Even at his own party,...

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