Jedism. The Religion Of Star Wars.

1447 words - 6 pages

The Return of the JediSo far this semester, we have studied several different sociological theories of religion.These theories are built on both the known history of religions in the world and the cultures inwhich they originated, as well as, appropriately enough, theoretical suggestions of how those religions, and indeed any religion at all, will survive in the future. The theory I find the most true is Stark and Bainbridge's in The Future of Religion, although I like some elements from others, like Berger's concepts of reification and secularization.George Lucas's Star Wars trilogy, apart from being incredibly entertaining and extremely well-made, gives us a complete portrait of a society (The Empire) and a religion (Jediism, for lack of a better term). Although the movies are mostly devoted to the growth of the characters, throughout the trilogy we see the society change in a drastic manner. This paper will examine the history of Jediism, the current (as of the end of the last movie) status of the religion, and offer some suggestions as to what we can expect from Jediism in the future.I. The ReligionTo examine the future of religion as it relates to society, one must first have an idea of the tenets and beliefs on which the religion is based. Jediism is based solely on belief in the 'force', a 'Universal energy field that surrounds us and permeates us'. (O. Kenobi, SW) Stark and Bainbridge make the point that any religion based on magic or magic-like rituals is fated to die out unless the magic can work constantly and consistently. This, they argue, is why many religions change from promising magic, which is quite verifiable (Did he, in fact, levitate?) to promising compensators, a sort of unverifiable magic. A good example of this is the Christian Heaven. Stark and Bainbridge take it as a given, however, that magic, or abilities that parallel magic, do not, in fact, exist. This makes an attempt to theorize about the future of Jediism more difficult, since the religion is based, in part, on the belief that oneness with the 'force' has the ability to confer extraordinary powers to individuals-- a belief than is vindicated numerous times throughout the series.The internal organization of the religion is, apparently, entirely nonexistant. There is no leader, nor is there any defined structure. Much like classical Taoism, various masters exist, and students and supplicants must seek out a master on their own in order to learn. There is no hierarchy to advance in, other than the ability to eventually hone one's faith to a degree that one can take on one's own students. The test of this is whether the student becomes attached to the 'dark side' of the 'force', as did Obi-Wan Kenobi's first pupil, Anakin Skywalker, later known as Darth Vader.The beliefs of Jediism, again, can be compared to classical Taoism. The 'true' Jedi believes in calm, and strives to maintain calm at all times. He can experience emotions, but he does not let his emotions...

Find Another Essay On Jedism. The religion of Star Wars.

The Wars of Religion Essay

1445 words - 6 pages century, extending into the seventeenth century, during a series of wars which would later on come to be called “the wars of religion.” But is this title completely appropriate? For wars claiming to be centered on religion, they seem to carry an awfully heavy load of political baggage. In fact, one could argue that the wars in France, the Netherlands, as well as in the Holy Roman Empire, had many more political influences than religious. Religion

The Star Wars Trilogy Essay

739 words - 3 pages The Star Wars Trilogy      The First of the three part series, Star Wars, is the tale of a band of heros who team together for the good of the universe and the money. The story begins as Princess Leia is held hostage by the Galactic empire in order to crush the rebellion against them. During the attack on Leia's ship two droids, R2-D2 and C-P30, escape through an escape pod. They landed on a foreign planet and were

The Monomyth Through Star Wars

2845 words - 11 pages to spot the monomyth structure within a story. (Martin) George Lucas or the man I hope we would know by now as the creator of Star Wars, in various occasions has credited Campbell’s theory of the monomyth as the inspiration for his intergalactic series of films. It is quite easy to pick out many of the structures of a monomyth within the films. Often this popular example is used in classrooms when teaching the monomyth since it makes it easily

Reagan and the Star Wars

1563 words - 6 pages The collapse of Soviet Russia (USSR) and the overall end to the Cold War can be greatly accredited to a program conceived during the Reagan administration known as Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Proposed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983 the program was eventually nicknamed "Star Wars" by many in the media after the popular 1977 film by George Lucas. The idea was, simply put, a defensive shield surrounding America that would

The Role of the Individual: A look inside the Galactic World of Star Wars (1977)

1664 words - 7 pages Star Wars takes place a long time ago in a galaxy that is unlike anything modern society could conceive as being authentic. It exists in a time before Earth was even thought of. At the start of the movie, a civil war is occurring between the Rebel Alliance and The Galactic Empire. A leader of the Rebel Alliance, Princess Leia, stole plans from the Galactic Empire (also known as the Imperial forces) for the Death Star. The Death Star was a very

Comparison of Star Wars & The Matrix in relation to the Hero's Quest

1694 words - 7 pages back-story; the Rebels are good and the Empire's bad, and that's just the way it is.Also, while Star Wars has arguably influenced the way an entire generation thinks about morality, ethics, and religion, The Matrix is far more explicit in terms of the kind of worldview it advocates. The first thing anyone says to Neo in The Matrix is in a message that comes to him via his computer: "Wake up, Neo." It so happens that the character is sleeping at

Apply the structuralist theories of Todorov, Barthes, Propp and Levi-Strauss to "Star Wars" or a text of your choice!!

583 words - 2 pages the well-known sci-fi "Star Wars". We can applyTodorov's theory to the beginning of Star Wars; we find out through text on the screenthat there has been an event, which has disrupted the peace between 2 opposingforces. Firstly, there was equilibrium but an event occurred leading to some plans hadbeen stolen, and Darth Vader planning an attack on the empire to pull Princess Lea outof power. This leads a series of events, which carry on through the

The French Wars of Religion : What were the causes and consequences of King Henry IV's death?

1496 words - 6 pages Aside from the French wars of religion, the assassination of King Henry IV was one of the major events which had left a significant impact onto the French. It was surprising for the mass when the king was murdered because he had already done so much for the country - not only because of his role as a king, but also for the people and the country which he was concerned. But was it really appalling? The Catholics and the Huguenots did not have a

Star Wars. Essay proving that the US was incapable of bringing it to life. Speaks of the economy, technology and treaties and political obligations

1265 words - 5 pages During the mid 1980's, American president Ronald Regan introduced the Strategic Defence Initiative (SDI), which the press quickly shortened to Star Wars. The purpose of Star Wars was to create a shield over America through which no nuclear weapon could pass. As then Senator Nunn (A supporter of SDI), once said ' I don't think anything in this country is technically impossible. We have a nation that can indeed produce miracles'. The purpose of

The Hour of the Star

1238 words - 5 pages Asses the role of the narrator in The Hour of the Star?The narrator in all stories which contain one has always had a major role because it is the narrator who tells the reader any necessary background information as well as sets the mood for a particular scene. In this novella the narrator is even more important because not only plays the role of the narrator but also plays a major character. The narrator has a neutral opinion on portraying the

The Hour of the Star

1818 words - 7 pages The Hour of the Star As Clarice Lispector was writing what would become her last literary creation, The Hour of the Star, little did she know that while her body was plagued with the devastations of cancer, her mental struggle for peace and grace in death would inspire her most renowned novel. Perhaps it is because of those circumstances, she created a novel with intuitive reflections on both life and death, as seen through the life of the

Similar Essays

Star Wars And Religion Essay

1442 words - 6 pages Star Wars and Religion Methodology In conducting my research on Star Wars, I wanted to make sure that I kind of found a variety of sources. I decided to do my field report on Star Wars originally because I was aware that I needed to include an interview component in this report. I immediately thought of my R.A., who just happens to be an incredibly huge Star Wars fan. I knew that I would have to investigate some element of the movies

Star Wars: Myth Or Religion? Essay

2744 words - 11 pages Star Wars: Myth or Religion? I was in a room, not a very large room, but big enough for the circle of odd numbered minds that had been assembled to discuss, debate, theorize, or maybe just waste time, on the topic at hand. I am a mere observer, with nothing more than a pen, my thoughts, and a strong will to keep my mouth closed when some reporter, author, or other member of the crowd makes some outlandish comment. I was there for no

Discuss And Evaluate What Part Eastern Philosophy And Religion Play In George Lucas's Conception Of Star Wars?

669 words - 3 pages for the interpreter.Clearly the Force of the Star Wars films is not like the concepts typically found in Eastern or Western religion or philosophy. We then have the opportunity to learn about just what the Force is. We can also attempt to find if it is a more coherent description of ultimate reality than the concepts typically found in Eastern or Western religion or philosophy.Near the end of Star Wars: A New Hope, when Luke destroys the death star

The Origins Of Star Wars Essay

910 words - 4 pages The Origins of Star Wars In the movie Star Wars, Director and Screenplay writer George Lucas creates a very complex, believable universe. Lucas borrows many things from different places to create his universe.This paper will show whether or not he succeeds and how does he does it. The origins of the much of Star Wars will be explained and the symbolic nature of the characters will be touched upon, as well as a brief history of the most important