John Lock´S Theories Of Human Nature Vs. Jean Jacques Rousseau´S Theories

1498 words - 6 pages

Soham Patel
Sema Binay
POL 1201
7 March 2014
My Superior Theory
Every day I come across other individuals who believe their opinions are superior to mine. It is petty to see the minds of hundreds of individuals trying to prove me wrong, when all they do is misrepresent the current facts of nature. Jean-Jacques Rousseau believes his theories on human nature and social contract are superior to mine, however through years of analyzing human nature I can conclude my theories are superior. First of all, let it be known that my theories are based upon years of witnessing and investigating the true nature of humans and the social contract, so it is unthinkable to believe Rousseau’s unjust theories. Most of my logic behind human nature can be found in my writings, The Two Treatises of Government, where I discuss the roles of citizens and the sovereign in my political philosophies. Let us begin by comparing our opinions on that State of Nature, because to understand political power, we must first understand the state that men are naturally in and their origin (Locke, 262).
The State of Nature is a state of complete freedom for an individual to go about his or her life as they see fit. Yet, they don't have absolute freedom, they cannot do anything at all that they please. In my book I said, “"to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature” (Locke, 262). Humans have no government or rulers of any sort to dictate the individual’s needs and desires. One cannot be punished for doing as he pleases, because the individual only obeys himself and the Law of Nature. The Law of Nature is similar to your morals, humans resist from harming others and only take what they need. This is why, in the State of Nature, humans are indifferent towards each other, or see each other as equals. Since we all belong to God equally, we cannot harm each other, because in doing so we would be harming God. However, he can harm another individual when in self-defense, or if someone were to threaten his property, and break the Laws of Nature. “Each transgression may be punished to that degree, and with so much severity as will suffice to make it an ill bargain to the offender, give him cause to repent, and terrifying others from doing the like” (Locke, 267). In conclusion, the State of Nature, is a state of freedom, where individuals can pursue what is beneficial to themselves, without harming the will of others.
I read Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Discourse on the Social Contract, regarding his opinions on the Nature of Humans and social contract. I must say, that it is well written and follows much of my opinions, however he seems to have many common misconceptions of the realities of human nature. He says when man is at his natural state, he will never harm another individual.
“Nothing is so gentle as man in his primitive stage, when, placed by nature at an equal distance from the stupidity of brutes and the...

Find Another Essay On John Lock´s Theories of Human Nature vs. Jean-Jacques Rousseau´s Theories

Jean-Jacques Rousseau Essay

1317 words - 5 pages Jean-Jacques Rousseau      “I was born to a family whose morals distinguished them from the people.” (Josephson 9) Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712. He became the son of Isaac Rousseau, a plebian class watchmaker, and Suzanne Bernard, the daughter of a minister who died shortly after giving birth to him. Rousseau’s baptism ceremony was a traditional one held at St. Peter’s Cathedral on July 4, 1712 by...

Jean Jacques Rousseau. Essay

2358 words - 9 pages Jean Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva on June 18, 1712. He was raised by his father and then later by his aunt and uncle. This all happened not long after the death of his mother. Rousseau spent most of his life in France. He was a social and political philosopher that put together enlightenment and romantic themes in his writings. His main focus...

Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2042 words - 8 pages Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau all dealt with the issue of political freedom within a society. John Locke's “The Second Treatise of Government”, Mill's “On Liberty”, and Rousseau’s “Discourse On The Origins of Inequality” are influential and compelling literary works which while outlining the conceptual framework of each thinker’s ideal state present...

John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau on Equality and Democracy

1567 words - 6 pages Fighting for democracy in an age of monarchies in Europe, John Locke was a revolutionary thinker whose belief in human reason and self-rule inspired many intellectuals centuries after his death. Advocating the "general will," or actions and decisions for the good of the community rather than one's self, the insight of

Comparison of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

1269 words - 5 pages Human nature and its relevance in determining behaviors, predictions, and conclusions has caused dispute among philosophers throughout the ages. Political philosophy with its emphasis on government legitimacy, justice, laws, and rights guided the works of the 17th and 18th century philosophical writings of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Through Thomas Hobbes world-renowned publication Leviathan and Rousseau’s discourses on basic...

Inferring Freedom and Equality. Speaks of Jean Jacques Rousseau

992 words - 4 pages Many of Earth's organisms and processes depend on each other to survive the natural world. Jean Jacques Rousseau employed this aspect of natural dependency to connect the ideas of freedom and equality together. Rousseau theorized many ingenious ideas for an upcoming legitimate government. The

The Life and Philosophies of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

841 words - 3 pages Jean-Jacques Rousseau was an influential French philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment. Rousseau was born on the eighteenth of June 1712 and died in 1778. During his lifetime, this philosopher brought about many new thoughts and ideas that help create the societies of most countries today. Some of his ideas helped contributed to concepts such as civilization being responsible for corrupting humanity's nature, child development, possibilities...

Comparison of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

1147 words - 5 pages While Hobbes and Rousseau address many of the same issues and topics in both The Leviathan as well as The Discourses, the way that Hobbes and Rousseau look at these issues such as, human nature, the state, and inequality are extremely different from each other. In some cases Hobbes and Rousseau’s opinions on these certain ideas are completely contradicting and opposite of each other. While it is tough to say which viewpoint, Hobbes’ or...

The Theories of Jean Piaget

1108 words - 4 pages The Theories of Jean Piaget This essay is about Jean Piaget's theory. Piaget's theory has two main strands: first, an account of the mechanisms by which cognitive development takes place; and second, an account of the four main stages of cognitive development through which children pass. Piaget suggested that there are four main stages in the cognitive development of children. In the first two years, children pass...

Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2132 words - 9 pages Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau developed theories on human nature and how men govern themselves. With the passing of time, political views on the philosophy of government gradually changed. Despite their differences, Hobbes and Rousseau, both became two of the most influential political theorists in the world. Their ideas and philosophies spread all over the world influencing the creation of...

Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2212 words - 9 pages Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau have very different views on the social contract largely based on their fundamental views of the state of nature in humanity. These basic views of natural human nature cause Hobbes and Rousseau to have views on opposite sides of the spectrum, based on two controversial speculations, that human is inherently good or that human is inherently inclined towards egotism and perpetual insecurity. Due to his...

Similar Essays

Jean Jacques Rousseau And The Essence Of Human Nature

1757 words - 7 pages Rousseau starts his discourse with the quote, “What is natural has to be investigated not in beings that are depraved, but in those that are good according to nature” (Aristotle. Politics. II). It is this idea that Rousseau uses to define his second discourse. Rousseau begins his story of human nature by “setting aside all the facts” (132). Rousseau believes the facts of the natural state of humanity are not necessary to determine the natural...

John Locke Vs Jean Jacques Rousseau. Essay

1693 words - 7 pages John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau are great political philosophers that have many similar insights about society and its political form. However, when closely examining the writings of these thinkers, one can easily discover many subtle differences among them. The two...

Biography Of Jean Jacques Rousseau Essay

2216 words - 9 pages Biography of Jean-Jacques Rousseau MAN is born free; and everywhere he is in chains. One thinks himself the master of others, and still remains a greater slave then they. How did this change come about? I do not know. How can it be...

Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosopher Essay

914 words - 4 pages Jean-Jacques RousseauPhilosopher1712 - 1778Never exceed your rights, andthey will soon become unlimited.--Rousseau--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born on June 28, 1712 in Geneva, Switzerland. His mother died shortly after his birth. When Rousseau was 10 his father fled from Geneva to avoid imprisonment for a minor offense,...