This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla: Bram Stoker’s Inspiration For Dracula

1587 words - 6 pages

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla: Bram Stoker’s Inspiration for Dracula

“3 May. Bistritz. Left Munich at 8:35 p.m.” Abraham Stoker in this unassuming way begins his Gothic masterpiece, Dracula (The Annotated Dracula 1). Dracula has been called ‘imaginative’ and ‘original.’ , and Harry Ludlam calls it “the product of his own vivid imagination and imaginative research” (Senf 41). However, the originality of Stoker's Dracula is in doubt. By a similarity in the setting, characters and plot, in Bram Stoker’s Gothic work Dracula and the posthumously published short story “Dracula’s Guest,” Stoker is shown to have used Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s classic, Gothic, short story, “Carmilla”, as the basis and inspiration for Bram Stoker’s vampiric masterpiece, Dracula.

In 1897, Abraham Stoker published Dracula, a classic Gothic novel which continues to capture the hearts and imaginations of readers after nearly a century. The novel is written as a collection of journals, which are kept in a wide array of methods, letters and newspaper clippings. Dracula opens in Eastern Europe with a young solisitor named Jonathan Harker traveling to Transylvanian castle. The castle’s owner, Count Dracula, is cruel in the manner of great evil, and uses Harker to have himself safely ferried to England and its fertile hunting ground of London. Dracula soon becomes embroiled in the lives of a small group of friends who see him for the fiend that he is. These young people, aided by the aging Dr. Van Helsing vow to see Dracula destroyed, and they succeed in driving him out of England and back to his homeland. They follow hard upon and catch him just before he reaches the safety of his castle. Within sight of safety, Jonathan Harker and Quency Morris behead the despotic Dracula and watch his evaporate into dust..

After Stoker’s death, his widow, a woman in need of money, published a volume of his short stories; included in the collection was “Dracula’s Guest,’ the deleted first chapter to Dracula. In recent years, “Dracula’s Guest” has received a large amount of critical attention due to Stoker’s obvious debt to fellow Irishman Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (Senf, 38). The story opens in Munich where a young Englishman is taking a holiday from his trek to the home of Dracula. The young Englishman of the story decides to take a walk to a deserted village despite the objections of others who know more than he about the area and its dangers. He is caught in terrible blizzard and is forced to find shelter. Shelter comes in the form of one Countess Dolingen of Gratz’s impaled tomb. Inside the tomb, he sees a young, pretty, pink-faced woman; the tomb is struck by lightening which destroys both the tomb and presumibly the woman. The Englishman is found, with the aid of a wolf’s yelps, by solders sent to search for him by Dracula.

In 1871, Irish writer Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu published In A Glass Darkly, a collection of short stories including “Carmilla”, which can...

Find Another Essay On Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla: Bram Stoker’s Inspiration for Dracula

10 Dimensions for Dracula by Bram Stoker The aesthetic and psychological views on Dracula

1029 words - 4 pages stereotypical view of Count Dracula. We see that the antagonist is a very intelligent, and powerful man in the novel. Yet many of the movies and materials based on the book show Count Dracula as a blood-lusting madman.Stoker for the most part set the story up amazingly well. Throughout the book Count Dracula himself is rarely seen, yet he makes the readers feel the presence of an evil being throughout the entire novel. Stoker has also been very careful to

Intertextual Exchange in Carmilla, Dracula and the Historian

1635 words - 7 pages “Writers seldom duplicate their influential precursor(s); rather, they often work within a certain framework established by other writers or generic conventions, but vary aspects of it in significant ways” (Friedman 155). Sheridan Le Fanu’s, Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and Elizabeth Kostova’s, The Historian, clearly engage in this intertextual exchange, as evidenced by their use of narrative structure and striking character parallels

Carmilla and Dracula

1515 words - 6 pages humanity at that time, that they would not have been able to do otherwise. __________________________________________________________ Finn, Page 5 BIBLIOGRAPHY Klüsener, Bea. "Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla and Bram Stoker’s vampire ladies as representations of Cesare Lombroso’s donna delinquente? ." Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt.Germany (2010): Pg 1-12. Print. Le Fanu, J. Sheridan. In a Glass Darkly. London: Bentley and Son, 1872. Print. Stoker, Bram. Dracula. 1897. New York: Oxford University Press, Print.

Intertextual Exchange in Carmilla, Dracula and the Historian

1355 words - 5 pages “Writers seldom duplicate their influential precursor(s); rather, they often work within a certain framework established by other writers or generic conventions, but vary aspects of it in significant ways.” (Clayton, 155). Sheridan Le Fanu’s, Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and Elizabeth Kostova’s, The Historian, clearly engage in this intertextual exchange, as evidenced by their use of narrative structure, striking character parallels and

Intertextual Exchange in Carmilla, Dracula and The Historian

998 words - 4 pages “Writers seldom duplicate their influential precursor(s); rather, they often work within a certain framework established by other writers or generic conventions, but vary aspects of it in significant ways.” (Clayton, 155). Sheridan Le Fanu’s, Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and Elizabeth Kostova’s, The Historian, clearly engage in this intertextual exchange, as evidenced by their use of narrative structure, striking character parallels and

Abraham Stoker and Theater

1592 words - 7 pages , Dublin Evening Mail, penning reviews of various theatrical productions in the City of Dublin (“Bram Stoker”). An interesting sidelight to this “job” was Stoker’s acquaintance with sheridan le fanu, joint-owner of the evening mail. Le Fanu was a popular writer of honor tales. One of his more famous stories, “Carmilla” told of a six year old girl who was bitten by a vampire. Stoker enjoyed Le Fanu’s gripping tales of nightmares, ghosts, haunted, houses

Vampiric Relations: An Argument on Gender Paradigms

2480 words - 10 pages In late nineteenth century Europe, Vampirism became an increasingly popular theme in Gothic novels. While Bram Stoker’s Dracula is by far the most popular from this time, it is neither the first nor the most progressive of its kind. In fact, in 1872, J. Sheridan Le Fanu published “Carmilla”, a short story featuring a female vampire that preys upon young women. This progressive story shows many scenes of homosexual exchange between Carmilla and

Comparison Between Dracula by Bram Stroker and Twilight by Stephen Meyeres

1178 words - 5 pages aspect of vampire tales is also apparent in “Carmilla” (Joseph le- Fanu 1872). As pointed out by Punter and Byron, Laura experiences intense erotic advances from the female vampire, to the extent of being puzzled about her own sexual orientation, demonstrating the highly homosexual nature of the text. Thus it is evident from aforementioned sources that the portrayal of the vampire began as an aggressive and sexually ferocious creature. This

The Effects of Modern Vampires on Society , A long road from Dracula to Twilight

2449 words - 10 pages . (Mörk, 14) Polidory’s vampire was much more like today’s vampires in the way that women are attracted to him and this creature is very polite. However, he is also scary, because his eyes are cold and grey. Due to this new representation, several publications appeared, such as James Malcolm Rymer’s Varney the Vampire or Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Camilla. These works were widely known, but the real breakthrough came in 1897, when the Irish author

The Lilith in Dracula, Carmilla, Christabel, Geraldine and The Hunger

1541 words - 6 pages The Lilith in Dracula, Carmilla, Christabel, Geraldine and The Hunger For centuries Lilith, the Queen of the Night, has been blamed when a child or man dies without certain cause or when a woman refuses to be submissive to her husband.  While the Legend of Lilith is not widely known today, it is not difficult to find information about the demoness. However, there are slight variations found from story to story.  Here we will focus on

Past, Present and Future- Stoker’s Impact

1087 words - 5 pages which way one may turn they see vampires on TV, in new novels and whatnot. True Blood, Twilight, and the House of Night novels all have Stoker to thank for inspiration. “It remains unclear what Stoker would have made of Twilight” (Shear 1). Dracula has been recreated as many films over the years and has just been more recently converted into a TV series. Over the years the influence Bram Stoker’s Dracula, has grown and never faltered in the way of

Similar Essays

Bram Stoker’s Dracula Essay

815 words - 4 pages Bram Stoker’s legendary novel, Dracula, is not simply any literary piece of gothic-spawning fiction, but rather a timeline containing the popular thoughts, ideas, and beliefs of the Victorian era that paints a vivid description of what society was like for Bram Stoker’s generation. The dated ideas reflected in Dracula focus primarily on the concepts of lust, intimacy, and immorality as they were depicted during the late 19th and 20th century

Bram Stoker’s Dracula Essay

1468 words - 6 pages different, and he is made this way for a specific reason. We later find out that he is a Vampire and the reason for his being is to feast on the living. Suspense is a reoccurring theme in this novel, Dracula. The Count touched Hakers and made him feel: “ As the count leaned over me and his hands touched me… a horrible feeling of nausea came over me, which, do what I would, I could not conceal”(Stoker, Bram) This shows a certain supernatural presence

Homosocial Friendships In Bram Stoker’s Dracula

1318 words - 5 pages Bram Stoker was born into a lower-class Irish family in late 1847. He grew up with six siblings, at least four of which were brothers. Throughout his childhood, Stoker was an invalid, sickened with an unknown disease. Many days were spent listening to his mother tell stories of Ireland. It is thought that her stories played a large role in his writing (Stoker 5). Perhaps due to Stoker’s childhood illness and relationship with his

Discuss The Relationship Between Sexuality And Religion In The Stories Of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

2733 words - 11 pages Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu was a man who employed his own kind of fiery shorthand to describe and explain the Irish society in which he lived. He was almost constantly at work throughout his lifetime as an author of fourteen novels, short stories, poetry and a verse drama. Although the majority of his novels are specifically set in the English countryside, they become clearer when they are transferred to an Irish setting. During Le Fanu’s last