Judaism Essay

983 words - 4 pages

We see that Mr and Mrs Birling are more embarrassed at being found out for their thoughtless treatment of Eva Smith than regretting what happened to her as a consequence. Mr Birling is more concerned with losing his knighthood than a young girl losing her life. Mrs Birling appears not to believe that someone like Eva, a 'lower class' person, could even have feelings, let alone need them taking into account. Eric and Sheila show us hope in the future generation being more humanitarian. Eric may be a drunken fool on the outside, but he did try to provide for Eva, and certainly took the Inspector's words to heart. Sheila is comfortable in discussing and revealing the hidden faults which are ignored in their circle; for example Eric's drunkenness and the Alderman's lascivious ways. She sees through the Inspector's message that honesty, clarity and sensitivity are the true values of society.There are differences between the generations when concerning the characters attitudes and how much responsibility they take, this can be exemplified, mainly when the Inspector reveals what has happened. The older generation can be exemplified through Mrs. Birling, Mr. Birling and Gerald, their attitudes revolve around protecting their own social status whereby do not seem to care for anyone but themselves and their family, this can be recognised when the Inspector reveals all about Eva Smith, and their reaction to this awful death, even though they are involved, seems to be non-existent, through evidence from the inspector, they still persist that they haven't participated to this death. They are completely unsympathetic towards the girl and take no responsibility for their actions as their domineering behaviour makes them feel as if they have done nothing wrong this can be shown when Mrs Birling states "I think she had only herself to blame." by stating this she reiterates to the Inspector that she feels she has no involvement in the death, by stating 'only herself to blame' in relevance to Eva's death is very cruel and self-centred, as she is clearly trying to revert back to it being Eva's fault therefore diminishing herself and her family out of the equation even though she can be considered to play a large part in her death. As they are higher class than this girl they also feel as though the death is less important, as Mrs Birling states 'Girls of that class -" this demonstrates that she was prejudice towards the girl whereby due to her class and her position (getting pregnant and not being married) she was therefore not eligible to deserve any money from the charity, this can also be reiterated from when she states "I'm Mrs Birling, y'know" by patronising the Inspector she's reminding him of her status, showing him that she should not have an involvement because she is of a higher class than him...

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