Kate Chopin's "The Storm" Essay

1060 words - 4 pages

Today's society still has certain expectations of whom we should love. There is several factors that stand in the way of with we love. For example, I was put into a predicament when it came to marrying my husband because of religion. He is a Catholic and I am Christian, so his parents and mine said we could not be together without there being conflict. My husband and I did not care about what religion we were because we were in love. Therefore, we both decided to get married at The Justice of Peace, because our parents did not agree with being from two different religions. We choose not to give into to society's expectations and now are living a happy life. The author Kate Chopin is trying to get across that sex and infidelity is not a sin but looked at as a part of life. She is trying to say that not all societies should keep anyone apart who is of a different race, class, or religion. The theme of "The Storm" by Kate Chopin is that society should not keep two people who have consummate love and passion for each other because of their social status.One of the major events would be the storm. According to Chopin, "Bobinot, who was accustomed to converse on terms of perfect equality with his little son, called the child's attention to certain sombre clouds that were rolling with sinister intention from the west, accompanied by a sullen, threatening roar" (176). This means that adultery is a sin and can destroy lives and it is looked upon as being evil. The storm is part of nature's way of shielding them from society. They are able to express their love for each other in an intimate way with out society telling them that they cannot be together because of their social class. They come together as one, and not as individuals from different lives. According to class discussion, Chopin experienced this first hand in her life, she cared for man by the name of Albert Sampite, and she was married to Oscar Chopin. The author has led us to believe that maybe she too was in a loveless marriage that maybe lead to an adulteress affair.Chopin says Calixta is of a Creole race and that was not another reason why she could not be with Alcee. The author herself is of a Creole race by her mother and Irish race by her father. So therefore, she relates a lot to Calixta's character. According to William Faulkner, "noblesse oblige, was the obligation of those of high birth or rank to behave honorably" ("A Rose for Emily" 105). People at this time could not fall in love with common people because of their class. According to class discussions wealthy people in this society were the only ones who could afford to finish school so they would speak proper English and the lower class would only go up to grade school or not at all because they had to work for a living. Bobinot was a man of labor he and Calixta had a farm. The character Alcee rode a horse while Bobinot walked. The high-class...

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