Forms Of Colonialism In Achebe's Things Fall Apart

727 words - 3 pages

"When the missionaries came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. They said, "Let us pray." We closed our eyes. When we opened them we had the Bible and they had the land." said Bishop Desmond Tutu. Chinua Achebe illuminates two painful features of African life, the first one is the abasement practiced on the IBO people by their own traditions and customs, and the second one is the control of land and natural resources by European missionaries in the form of direct colonization of Nigeria. Things Fall Apart focuses on the transition when it is being deep-rooted, for instance traditional values are put in conflict with a strange but powerful culture that will split them apart because of the arrival of the missionaries and their determination to idealize another culture. The villagers, in general , are disconcerted between resistance and acceptance of change, in addition, they face the problem of trying to determine the way to adapt to the current situation. Many of the villagers are keyed up about the new opportunities and techniques that the missionaries are going to bring. This foreign influence, however, threatens to quench the need for the mastery of traditional methods in farming, production and all aspects of living. These traditional methods, once crucial for survival, are now, to varying degrees, not essential. That is, colonialism was the turning point that forced things to fall apart.Furthermore, Achebe portrays the idea of colonialism, and the way it quietly gains acceptance across the country and then takes over just when the country has been disrupted enough to be overruled by foreign forces. When religion is acting as the foothold, it makes it easier for a foreign government to take over because most religions support peace and control an essential part of people's lives. Achebe clearly emphasized that when Obierika said "How do you think we can fight when our own brothers have turned against us? The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one. He has put a knife on the things that held us together...

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