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King Lear Analytical Monologue Act 1, Scene 4, Lines 268 284

689 words - 3 pages

LEAR: It may be so, my lord.Hear, Nature, hear, dear goddess, hear!Suspend thy purpose if thou didst intend 270To make this creature fruitful.Into her womb convey sterility.Dry up in her the organs of increase,And from her derogate body never springA babe to honor her. If she must teem, 275Create her child of spleen, that it may liveAnd be a thwart disnatured torment to her.Let it stamp wrinkles in her brow of youth,With cadent tears fret channels in her cheeks,Turn all her mother's pains and benefits 280To laughter and contempt, that she may feel-That she may feelHow sharper than a serpent's tooth it isTo have a thankless child.-Away, away!In this particular monologue, it explores the theme, nature, immediately. Lear implores nature, to which he worships as a 'goddess' or deity to listen to his plea. He strongly believes that the god is capable of doing anything. For example, making her daughter sterile and drying up her womb so that no baby can come out.Before this monologue, Gonerill wishes that Lear would behave in an orderly manner and would listen to her. Lear then starts to question himself and he seems unable to believe that he is listening to his own daughter because he thinks he is their father and therefore should be able to do whatever he wants."Are you our daughter?" Lear says.Later on, the Fool shows regret for Lear's reduced status. Lear then becomes angry and declares he will go to Regan's castle instead assuming she would welcome him. Lear attacks Gonerill's ingratitude and defends his followers' honour. After this, in rage, Lear curses Gonerill with no children and if she did have children, they would be disobedient and unloving."Dry up in her the organs of increase, … derogate body never spring … Createher child of spleen, that it may live … disnatured torment to her. Let it stamp wrinkles in her brow of youth…" Lear curses.Shakespeare's King Lear is a play revolving around the themes of human nature, madness and childishness....

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