Women Of Australia In The 19th Century

806 words - 3 pages

womens in the 19th centuryThere wase'nt much womens in Australia around the early 19th century. As we know the first people was to come in Australia was Captain Cook and then came the convicts who got sent from all the way from England. Although the ships contained male and feamle number of convicts, the number of feamle was not enough to balance the man and female population. After 1810 more convicts ship came with more mens but less amount of womens. This continued till almost 20 years and the gornvent started to get worried on the population balance.Then a person called Carolin Chislom decided that she would contribute in helping the womens to reach here and have a safe life and earn a proper wage for their living. She got really concerned on about this because the number of man in Australia was far out number from the womens. So he decided to make an advertisment only for the womens who were interested on coming to Australia. She made an advertisment saying that Wanted womens in Australia, she also added some extra bonuses which meant that they could come in Australia and they would'nt have to pay for the immigration fee and they will get ten days of free accomodation so that meant no matter what after ten days they will have to get their own job. This meant unless they could find their own job within ten days they will have to beg for food and a place to stay where every they could. This continued for a while and there was no one to look after them or to care about them So Carolin Chislom an Army officer's wife who arrived in NSW in 1838, was horrified at what was happening to these young single women. She set out a help herself by walking around the park and streets to find those womens who are ineed of help. Once she found them she would take them to her home. Soon her house was starting to become overcrowded so she started to put some pressure on the governor in order to give her a place to help these single womens. When the governor gave her a building to use, her next target was to help them find a work place. Because it was a too expensive to goto the private emplaoyer they decided make a free employee place where they can just come and work when ever...

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