This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Late Nineteenth Century Imperialism: A Major Divergence

1217 words - 5 pages

American foreign policy of the late 19th century is often defined by the manner with which it had asserted itself onto the world stage, namely in terms of its reinvigoration of the Monroe Doctrine and its new found sense of imperial expansion. Though it is true that such incidents as the War of 1812, and such notions as Manifest Destiny had demonstrated these characteristics, it seems that the expansionist zeal of the latter part of the century was differed significantly. To start, both periods did, however, remain quite similar in that they both justified expansion with notions of Anglo-Saxon supremacy, and of spreading the benefits of Western, Christian civilization. Outside of this ...view middle of the document...

To start, a proponent of imperial expansion, Josiah Strong, posited that, “[i]t seems to me that God, with infinite wisdom and skill, is training the Anglo-Saxon race for an hour sure to come in the world’s future… [for the] unoccupied arable lands of the earth are limited and will soon be taken”. (Document B) Meanwhile, U.S. Senator Albert J. Beveridge proclaimed that, “[w]e will not renounce our part in the mission of our race, trustee under God, of the civilization of the world. And we will move forward to our work.. and thanksgiving to the Almighty God that He has marked us as His Chosen People”. Both quotes are utterly driven by notions of racial and religious supremacy, with Strong citing that the time shall come for the more “civilized’ races of people to conquer the rest of the world, and with Beveridge citing Americans as God’s “Chosen people”, essentially hinting to the Protestant belief in the “elect”. Therefore, the underlying ideology of this later imperialist movement is no different than that which had been espoused by its earlier counterparts.
Despite the aforesaid similarities in terms of justification, one would be pressed to define American expansion of the late 19th century as a continuation of previous outward growth. The first reason for such an assumption would be that the methods by which America achieved its imperialist goals have changed, perhaps in their entirety. While the objectives of Manifest Destiny were usually obtained through waggon trains, the Oregon Trail, and encroachment onto Native American lands, those of the 1880’s, ‘90’s and 1900’s were due in part to naval power. Alfred Mahan epitomizes this change, as he asserts that in order for America to establish itself as an imperial power, “[t]hree things are needful: First protection of the chief harbors… Secondly, naval force… which enables a country to extend its influence outward. And thirdly, no foreign state should henceforth acquire a coaling position within three thousand miles of San Francisco.” (Document C) Clearly naval supremacy has become the keystone of any expansion undertaken by the United States, and thus, marks a significant departure from previous policies. Furthermore, Theodore Roosevelt brought about the utilization of the Monroe Doctrine as an effective vehicle for American expansion: “[c]hronic wrongdoing, or an impotence which results in a general loosening of the ties of civilized society… in the Western Hemisphere [along with] the adherence of the United States to the Monroe Doctrine may force the United States… to the exercise of an international police power.” (Document F) Thus, under the auspices of the Monroe Doctrine and of the need to protect civilized order, Roosevelt has essentially established an American sphere of influence...

Find Another Essay On Late Nineteenth Century Imperialism: A Major Divergence

Religion as a Major Organizing Ideology to the Social and Political Reality of the Nineteenth-Century

3995 words - 16 pages Religious scholar, Stephen Prothero, sees religion as a major organizing ideology to the social and political reality of the nineteenth-century. For Prothero, there is a close and intimate ideological relation between theological beliefs and a culture; therefore, they are not separable from characterizing the religious mood of the nineteenth-century. Prothero argues that many Americans were, “inspired by [the] republican rhetoric of liberty

In the late nineteenth century, a select few Americans separated themselves from the rest by fulfilling the American Dream

769 words - 3 pages In the late nineteenth century, a select few Americans separated themselves from the rest by fulfilling the American Dream. William H. Vanderbilt attained wealth as a successful railroad executive when he joined the family railroad businesses and eventually succeeded his father as president. Andrew Carnegie became one the richest people through his domination of the steel industry. John D. Rockefeller intuitive business practices in the oil

Economic Expansion in the Late Nineteenth Century and Early Twentieth Century

890 words - 4 pages will be the survival of the fittest”. This related to imperialism because stronger countries like Britain and France used this “Burden” as an excuse to express their control over weaker countries. United States expansionism during the late ninetieth- century and early twentieth century were similar because of economic power and religious beliefs. Before the ninetieth century the United States had an agricultural economy and in the early twentieth century it had changed to a business economy. As the United States became a stronger nation it started to expand its influence into other countries.

Steamer Trunks and Social Class in Late Nineteenth Century and Early Twentieth Century America

690 words - 3 pages Dating back to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, steamships were ideal for travel. Steamships were wildly popular during this time because they were an advanced transportation that was more efficient than a railroad because it traveled across sea. The steamboat helped advance trade along the Mississippi and brought new towns, new industry, and new jobs. During this time, America was divided into social classes based on social

The three phases of the development of West Indies cricket since the late nineteenth century

1594 words - 6 pages The three phases of the development of West Indies cricket since the latenineteenth century.During the origination of cricket competitively in the nineteenth century, the distance and unreliable expenditure of inter-island transport caused Jamaican cricket to be closed off from the other islands. This resulted in more English touring teams than Caribbean teams and the mental effect of this also brought about disagreement over the assembly of

Compare and contrast America’s “Manifest Destiny” of the mid-19th century with its “Imperialism” of the late 19th century

1301 words - 6 pages , the Manifest Destiny became a popular idea to follow; it was God’s will for America to expand their land to the West Coast. However, after this was accomplished, Imperialism came about a short time period later. Imperialism is much like the Manifest Destiny, but in a more greedy way. Imperialism is most definitely glorified to seem like a favor America is doing—by becoming an empire—and taking these smaller nations and countries ‘under their

Reasons for Australian Federation Question: Discuss the reasons for and against federation that were considered during the late nineteenth century.

958 words - 4 pages . When trains were the main means of long-distance transport, having to change trains at the border of each colony was a great inconvenience for travellers. If the colonies federated, a uniform gauge would be developed, allowing trains to cross colonial borders. The growth of nationalism towards the end of the nineteenth century was a considerable factor in securing a federated Australia. In 1891, Sir Henry Parkes said, "Aren't we not one

Australian Federation discuss Arguments Used For and Against the Idea of Federation in the Late Nineteenth Century

862 words - 3 pages goods, which made them more expensive than local goods. The New South Wales government was particularly opposed to tariffs. A number of people were also concerned that import taxes may discourage overseas companies from trading with Australia altogether. No import taxes would be imposed on goods sent across other states once Australia had federated.The growth of nationalism towards the end of the nineteenth century was a considerable factor in

Some of the problems that many farmers in the late nineteenth century(1880-1900)saw as threats to their way of life(a)explain reasons for discontent(b)evaluate the validity of the farmers' complaints

675 words - 3 pages Documents A-H reveal some of the problems that many farmers in the late nineteenth century(1880-1900)saw as threats to their way of life.(a)explain the reasons for agrarian discontent and(b)evaluate the validity of the farmers' complaints.In the late 1800s, many farmers were trapped in a vicious economic cycle. Cropsprices began falling and farmers were often forced into mortgaging their farms so theycould buy more land and produce more crops to

To What Extent did the Values of the Enlightenment Fuel an 'Industrial Revolution' in Britain in the Late Eighteenth Century and Early Nineteenth Century?

1751 words - 7 pages Also known as 'The Age of Reason', the Enlightenment is a term used to describe a period emerging from centuries of darkness and ignorance into a new age enlightened by reason, science, and a respect for humanity. Although the Enlightenment is usually associated with the eighteenth century, it's roots go back much further and it is important to understand how the values of the enlightenment were shaped. Works such as Essay Concerning Human

Republicans and Democrats How evenly balanced were the Democratic and Republican Parties during the late nineteenth century? How did this balance flow from different regional and sociocultural bases?

660 words - 3 pages belonged to that party. Whatever the reason, most of the Americans during the era of the late nineteenth century were attached to their parties with great persistence and passion.Source:Brinkley, Alan. "American History: A Survey Tenth Edition." McGraw-Hill College. 1999

Similar Essays

Nineteenth Century British Imperialism Essay

514 words - 2 pages Were Economic Factors Primarily Responsible for Nineteenth-Century British Imperialism?           In society today the almighty dollar is what motivates most people’s actions. However, there are other reasons that can promote a change within a system such as morals, religious beliefs, values, and ethics. During the nineteenth century, society was not much different from that of the present day

What Attracted European Imperialism To Africa & To Asia In The Late Nineteenth Century

1641 words - 7 pages Mortimer Chambers et al define imperialism as a European state's intervention in and continuing domination over a non-European territory. During the 'Scramble for Africa' in the late nineteenth century, the most powerful European nations desired to conquer, dominate and exploit African colonies with the hope of building an empire. According to Derrick Murphy, in 1875 only ten percent of Africa was occupied by European states. Twenty years later

Describe Law And Order In The Late Nineteenth Century

1355 words - 5 pages considered unusual otherwise. The jury had to discuss their decision of the case in the same room; this meant the criminals were able to identify who saw them guilty.In conclusion, the police were a major beneficial part of the late nineteenth century. I think it was a good system to enforce as it was further development towards the system we hold today. It was effective in some situations but not all. Many people didn't accept them as they were seen to be biased in the people they helped. Although the appearance of police officers didn't complement them and led people to wonder what their objective was, they had good intentions at heart...hopefully.

Analysis Of The Appalachian Culture In The Late Nineteenth Century

1059 words - 4 pages ). In this paper, we will dig more deeply in the rich Appalachian culture that existed in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. We will focus on variety of interesting Appalachian cultural aspects such as music, dance and food. Before we ponder in the exquisite Appalachian cultural practices and beliefs, let us know more about its geographic region. “Appalachia is a 205,000-square-mile region that follows the spine of the Appalachian