Legalization Of Equine Slaughter Houses In The United States

1989 words - 8 pages

Shouldn’t everyone be able to have their own opinion, or at least have other options? Slaughter houses are not always a bad option, in some cases it may be the smart one. Slaughter houses can be an ideal option for horses that are old, lame, or dying; however not recommended for healthy unwanted horses.
Slaughter houses in the United States have had a hard time staying in business because of many controversial reasons. The last slaughter house closed in 2007, after congress banned slaughter houses by cutting funds for inspection in 2005. “But in 2011, the ban was lifted because the funding prohibition expired” (Gustin). Now, it is in debate whether slaughter houses will soon be legalized or not. United States Senator Max Baucus states, “Congress is moving closer to allowing United States’ horses to be slaughtered, with a move that allows inspections of the facility” (Baucus Praises Bill). Although, some people think that slaughter is completely inhumane, cruel, and wrong; there are others who have found positive reasons for slaughter houses. Some say it is a “humane solution for unwanted horses and it could also bring the potential of new jobs” (Gustin). This is a good point, because there are other options that could be considered less humane, and it is important to have enough jobs for a growing community. Others have also pointed out that it is an easier and cheaper option.
However, even though the anti-slaughter bill was passed, horses are still being slaughtered. Horses are being shipped across the border to Mexico and Canada (Smiley). It has recently been estimated that 100,000 horses are being shipped each year for their meat to be sold in Belgium, Iceland, France, Russia, Mexico and many other countries (Lin). Even Teagarden said, “Nothing they have done has stopped horses from dying, and it has not stopped horses from being processed. We are still shipping horses to Canada and Mexico.” Then why is there an argument to have slaughter legalized in the United States when the bill has not stopped the slaughtering in the first place?
The horses that are being sent across the border to be slaughtered are being shipped many miles in horrible conditions, to be slaughtered in less humane ways in other countries. Slaughter would be a better option if the facilities were legalized here in the United States (Clausing). Even Lindsey Rajt, from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) agreed that, “It is the lesser of two evils. If they are going to be killed, we would prefer they don’t have to endure a long trip to slaughter. There is no reason to be eating dead animals or to be using dead animals for food production at all, but the belief that horses are shipped out of this country, crammed in trailers built for cattle, has caused PETA to settle for another position” (Unruh).
There are still other choices besides slaughter, for the other owners who want options; euthanasia could be one of those options. Euthanasia is a painless...

Find Another Essay On Legalization of Equine Slaughter Houses in the United States

A Case for the Legalization of Prostitution in the United States

1696 words - 7 pages , prostitution is not legal in what is often called the city of sin, Las Vegas, due to state laws limiting prostitution in large urban areas.” Criminalizing prostitution due to a dated way of thinking s causes the United States to be restricted in sexual freedom. Ahmed claims that sex will be bought and sold no matter a country's laws; therefore, the question isn't how to get rid of sex work, it's how to make it safe for those who do it. Decriminalization

Politics in the United States of America

1383 words - 6 pages opinions. Opinion based on humanitarian grounds that urge the president to intervene using military action, is one of them. The proponents argue from the point of view that suffering demands action (Moyn 3). This group believes that the United States is in the best position than any other country to stop the suffering of the Syrian people and the bloodshed going on, and therefore no action from the US means more innocent lives will continue to be

Lack of Privacy in the United States

1095 words - 4 pages persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. (The United States) The personal privacy has been saved under American law since the 20th century. People can claim their right of living in a country that does not

Abolition of Slavery in the United States

1270 words - 6 pages In the United States, slavery was abolished very gradually and in most cases one state at a time. The issue of slavery has been debated for America since the very beginning of the founding of the country. At the time America became an independent country of British control, some wanted to end slavery and others who owned large plantations wanted to continue because they were making a large profit. The end of slavery started by the abolishment

Politics in the United States of America

1295 words - 5 pages Politics in the United States of America Introduction This paper seeks to research on Americans interest in Crimea with regard to the sanctions that have been attached to Russia recently by President Barrack Obama of the United States. Several banks have been blacklisted by the US government following the Russian infiltrations in Ukraine (Fisher 13). Majority of Russian businessmen in the United States who have close links with Vladimir Putin

Immigration in the United States of America

1118 words - 4 pages "Every immigrant who comes here should be required within five years to learn English or leave the country" said Theodore Roosevelt one of the forty four presidents of the United States. Nowadays, being a great empire in the international arena and the country full of opportunities America faces immigration from all over the world that in turn makes various problems within the country. It continues to be one of the controversial and divisive

Causes of Poverty in the United States

2271 words - 9 pages Causes of Poverty in the United States The United States defines poverty for a family of four as being less than $16,036 per year, or $4,009 per person (Leone 12). People find themselves under this line for an innumerable amount of reasons. Some of these causes are under one's control and others are greater factors beyond an individual's power. Each family or individual person has unique and separate reasons for living in a state poverty

History of prisons in the United States

798 words - 4 pages first buildings introduced in the New World. In early America prisons were not looked at like prisons are today, most crimes where punished on the spot and the person released. Most of the people that had long term sentences were people that owed debt. Other type of punishments that was used was fines, public shame, physical chastisement, and death. Misdemeanors were punishable by fines, just like some are today. The United States prison building

History of Immigration in the United States

1958 words - 8 pages Throughout the history of the United States immigration has become apart of our country’s fabric which, began centuries ago. Only to become a hot topic in the US in recent years with its primary focus being illegal immigrants. Illegal immigration is when people enter a country without government permission. As of 2008 the Center for Immigration Studies estimated that there are 11 million illegal immigrants in the US which is down from 2007‘s

Types of Immigrants in the United States

1199 words - 5 pages The United States is one of the best countries in the world and the one that people would most like to immigrate to. By the early nineteen thirty, almost all individuals around the world suffered from the Great Depression and World War II. Since that time, many individuals have come to the U.S. from several countries to realize the American Dream, which has the notions of equality, economic prosperity, and political liberty without oppression

Obstacles of Fathers in the United States

1744 words - 7 pages The purpose of this article is to better understand the outlooks, levels of engagement, and obstacles of fathers in the United States. The authors noted that fathers who participated in this survey range between the age of 18 and older. This telephone survey consists of fathers themselves answering questions related to their own fatherhood roles. Further, this article presents the results of the hundreds of American men promoting behaviors

Similar Essays

The Legalization Of Marihuana In The United States

1861 words - 8 pages Drugs have been a taboo for many centuries in the United States due to its exotic nature. Most other countries have already legalized drug use or never banned it all. The United States could legalize drugs and bring in many benefits. During the last couple of years legalization has become a major topic throughout the country. Colorado and Washington have become the first to legalize marijuana and both have benefitted greatly from it. If the

Legalization Of Prostitution In The United States Of America

2617 words - 11 pages vary considerably from country to country: in some countries it is punishable by death penalty ("Iran - Facts on Trafficking”), in some it is a crime punishable by prison sentence, while in other jurisdictions, it is a lesser administrative offense punishable only with a fine ("The Sentencing and Punishment”). Punishments are usually more severe for the sex workers and pimps than for the solicitors of prostitution. In the United States of America

Pro Legalization Of Marijuana In The United States

1686 words - 7 pages people who disagree and feel that it should stay an illegal drug. Marijuana has been around for centuries. It comes from the species of plant Cannabis Sativa, and is used for things other that its renowned drug form, such as rope, clothing, medicines, and oils. Other common names for it include weed, pot, grass, reefer, and bud. The drug was actually not outlawed in the United States until the passage of the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937, which made

A Case For The Legalization Of Marijuana In The United States

1693 words - 7 pages A Case for the Legalization of Marijuana in the United States The legalization of cannabis is an idea that has been discussed around the world for decades, but within the last few years, it has grown in popularity and support in this country primarily on a state-by-state basis. My goal in this paper is to show that as more and more states choose to legalize the use of cannabis, or marijuana for medical purposes, in fact, a very strong case