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Legalization Of Gay Marriage In Virginia

2284 words - 9 pages

Legalization of Gay Marriage in Virginia

For many years now the topic of Gay marriage has been a colossal topic of discussion throughout the United States. Questions such as “ Is it immoral? Or is it Moral “ emerge in these discussions quite often. But, the biggest question is whether it should be legalized or not. Although, the question of “ should it be legalized” is a very important question, the question of “ why is gay marriage illegal” rarely comes up. Which is a very interesting question that most people never stop to think about.
Gay marriage is currently legal in 17 states and banned in 33 states, with some states pending in legalization. ["17 States with Legal Gay Marriage and 33 States with Same-Sex Marriage Bans - Gay Marriage - ProCon.org."] When asked why gay marriage is illegal you hear many different answers based on ones own opinion. But, with these opinions based answers you often find that people contradict themselves and are biased. For example answers such as ,”Because it goes against the bible,” often comes up as an answer against. But, if that answer were to be true there wouldn’t be the law of Separation of Church and state. Also, answers such, as “It’s immoral and just wrong” appear, but they fail to realize what may seem wrong to them may seem right to someone else. So therefore that alone can’t make something illegal. As said before there are numerous responses to the question of why gay marriage is illegal, but rarely do you hear the right answer.
In 1996 on September 21 the United States federal law enacted The Defense of Marriage Act; otherwise known as DOMA. DOMA is a federal law that allows states to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages granted under the laws of other states. This federal law was active in many states for many years until 2013 when the Supreme Court ruled section 3 of DOMA unconstitutional. Sections three is what prevented the federal government from recognizing any marriages between gay or lesbian couples for the purpose of federal laws or programs, even if those couples are considered legally married by their home state. ["Frequently Asked Questions: Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)." GLAAD] The supreme court saw that it was important to rule out section three of DOMA because the repeal of the section would create a major increase in protection for homosexual couples in the United States. This granted legally married same sex-couples the same benefits received by heterosexual couples. Benefits such as: Health insurance and pension protections for federal employees’ spouses, Social security benefits for widows and widowers, support and benefits for military spouses, joint income tax filing, and etc. ["Frequently Asked Questions: Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)." GLAAD]
Although, the Supreme Court ruled section three unconstitutional, there are still the remaining sections of DOMA that prevent the legalization of gay marriage. These sections of DOMA make it...

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