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Lessons Learnt From The Rwandan Genocide

2549 words - 10 pages

The Impact of the Genocide
There were many consequences as a result of the genocide. For example, the economy in Rwanda was negatively impacted severely and regaining stability was slow, damages that took place during this period needed to be repaired and time and money needed to be invested (Our Grations, 2006). Entire families were wiped out and homes were destroyed (Hagengimana, 2001). Teachers being killed during the violence meant educating the young became a problem, further exacerbating economic problems (Our Grations, 2006). Fixing the roads, bridges and telephone lines cost money and had to be done over time (Our Grations, 2006). Majority of the killings were perpetrated by males, now incarcerated, who killed fellow males (Hagengimana, 2001). This meant there were now fewer men, disrupting gender ratios, leading to the promotion of polygamy and the practice of sharing men became common and elevated the further spreading of AIDS (Our Grations, 2006). Families in Rwanda were crippled by; death, disease, disability, poverty, loss of dignity and incarceration (Moodley, et al., 2010). There were also a lot of material, psychological and social trauma that followed the genocide (Hagengimana, 2001). Ihahamuka was introduced into the Rwandan vocabulary after the genocide, describing a form of post traumatic stress disorder and unusual antisocial behaviours resulting from living through the violence (Hagengimana, 2001). Increased deforestation was a key environmental impact of the genocide. This resulted in biodiversity and genetic resources being lost (Moodley, et al., 2010). Malaria also posed as a significant problem with serious repercussions for the survivors living after the genocide (Moodley, et al., 2010). The majority of the 300,000 Tutsi survivours were women (Topping, 2014). Many of which had been subject to a cruel amount of violence and had to witness thier husbands being hacked to death and their children thrown into latrines; some had been infected with HIV after being abducted and gang raped (Topping, 2014). Widows' associations such as Avega were formed by the widows of the genocide who only had each other to rely on (Topping, 2014). Members were gathered into associations that strived to get rape recognised as an instrument of genocide (Topping, 2014). As a result of the rape during the genocide 76% of survivours are now living with HIV (Topping, 2014). The government in Rwanda have acknowledged that the genocide was a disaster (Our Grations, 2006). Despite this, there are still many Tutsi and Hutu extremists who believe that in order to solve the problem another mass killing needs to be roused in order to exterminate the other group completely (Our Grations, 2006).

International Responses to the Genocide and after the Genocide
There was a lot of documentation on human rights violations in Rwanda during the build up to the genocide (Hymowitz & Parker, n.d). Including people who were imprisoned for their political views....

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