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Literary Analysis Of The Monkey Paw

1053 words - 5 pages

“The Monkey’s Paw” was a short story written by William Wymark Jacobs. Jacobs uses two themes in the short story to draw in his readers. The two themes are to be careful what you wish for and you can't get something for nothing. These two themes could provide the reader with a deeper understanding of the writing of “The Monkey’s Paw”. They are three people in the Whites family, Mr. White, Mrs. White, and their son Herbert White. They are a happy family who like in a relatively safe environment as there home is very separate from the outside world. The greed of the family turns this safe environment to a hostile one.
Sargent-Major Morris is a long lost friend of Mr. White and he appears at ...view middle of the document...

He wishes for, wish for 200 pounds. Mr. White has everything, but he is forced by greed to wish for more money. The Whites get what they want, but it also comes with a catch, a catch that no one in the family expected. Everything seemed to be going fine the next day until Herbert leaves for work. Not long after he is gone, a strange man comes to their house and informs Mr. and Mrs. White their son has been in an accident involving the machinery he was working with and he was instantly killed. The company Herbert was working for offers to help pay for his funeral expenses by providing Mr. and Mrs. White a sum of 200 pounds. The white wished for the 200 pounds and many would wish for money if there was a chance of getting without working, but in this case the family lost their son for money that was not really needed. The whites got the money they wanted, but at a price they didn’t want to pay.
Another example would be when Mrs. White was so devastated by the tragic death of her, that she encouraged and begged her husband to use his second wish to bring Herbert back from the grave. After the first wish, Mr. White got a feel that something was wrong with the monkey's paw and tried to convince his wife it would be a bad idea because their son may not come back the same person. The Whites do use for the son to come back and they a son they want back. Their son was decapitated so they had to of none that asking for their “SON” was pretty far fetch.
Mr. White and his son love playing chess. In “The Monkey’s Paw,” the chess game symbolizes life. Chess is a game that is unpredictable just like life. Certain things have to happen in order for things to change. The risk taking can dictate the radical changes in one’s life. Herbert is cautious in...

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