This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Literary Analysis: Survival Of The Wildest

694 words - 3 pages

In the novel, Devil in a Blue Dress by Walter Mosley, the author creates a self-serving sense in the characters. The writer uses straightforward style in order to create the milieu of the book and illustrates that dire situations will bring out the instinct of survival. The readers can see how the main character Easy Rawlins accepts a questionable job in order to pay the mortgage on his house. Mr. Albright hired Easy to find the whereabouts of Daphne Monet. As events unfold Easy discovers new information about why he was hired to find Daphne. He uses the new found info to his advantage by withholding it to gain more money. The main protagonist, Easy, illustrates an underlying theme of how most people only do things that benefit themselves as well as some who are willing to go beyond conventional lengths in order to succeed.
The novel starts as Easy Rawlins is sitting in “Joppy's bar”, an old run-down bar, illustrates the main character's economic status and that he is trying to drink his troubles away. He accepts the job offer from a man who has a grip “like a snake coiling around” his hand, implying that the man was not to be trusted as the author relates his grip to that of a deadly snake. The author's use of the simile in relating the mans grip to a snakes coil creates a venomous atmosphere. Although Easy was hesitant to accept that job, he had a “mortgage t'pay”, therefore he had to take the job otherwise he would lose his home. While living in the time of segregation in Los Angeles Easy desired to make something of himself. His desire led him to eventually own a house and to be able to continue living on that house he had to make an undesirable choice.
The author relates the characters Mouse and Albright as symbols of people who are self-centered. Both Mouse and Albright “always got business in front'a” their minds, illustrating that these characters would do...

Find Another Essay On Literary Analysis: Survival of the Wildest

The Importance of Survival Essay

1437 words - 6 pages Survival is the on going, persistent fight for one’s life. As humans, it’s our natural-born instinct to survive no matter how hard or unusual the circumstance. Life of Pi teaches us that it is never easy to survive, along with some of the essentials that we need in our everyday life. Pi’s 227 days at sea is a prime example of how incredibly difficult and extensive a given situation could be. There are many themes in this novel that one could

Survival of the Fittest Essay

950 words - 4 pages invade than the Eastern Empire. Another big factor in its survival was the fact that they had better leaders than the Western Empire did, as can be seen with Constantine (even though he was ruler of both empires, he is more associated with the Byzantine Empire, seeing as how he favored it), Theodosius I and Justinian I. In the Western Empire, things weren’t so great for them. First off, when the empire had previously been plagued with sickness

survival of the fittest

3059 words - 12 pages . Diseases in the first category have evolutionary pressure against virulence. These microbes The host is able to deal with the parasitic consequences because the microbe/parasite depends on the host to remain stable as it continues to evolve under the guiding principles of survival and reproduction. Transmission through food and water is more deadly, due to its accessibility to other hosts19. Humans advantage in the race is our knowledge; Humans can

survival of the fittest

3059 words - 12 pages . Diseases in the first category have evolutionary pressure against virulence. These microbes The host is able to deal with the parasitic consequences because the microbe/parasite depends on the host to remain stable as it continues to evolve under the guiding principles of survival and reproduction. Transmission through food and water is more deadly, due to its accessibility to other hosts19. Humans advantage in the race is our knowledge; Humans can

The Odyssey Literary Analysis

1419 words - 6 pages “The Odyssey” is an epic poem that tells the story of Odysseus and the story of his many travels and adventures. The Odyssey tells the main character’s tale of his journey home to the island of Ithaca after spending ten years fighting in the Trojan War, and his adventures when he returns home and he is reunited with his family and close friends. This literary analysis will examine the story and its characters, relationships, major events

"The Outlaw" Literary Analysis

735 words - 3 pages E N G3U1-07October 24, 20131Lit e rary Ana l ysis of " The O utl aw " by Sin c lair R o ssNeetya SarinThrough the use of literary elements and techniques such as symbolism, anthropomorphism and figurative language, Sinclair Ross addresses the theme of isolation, both literal and figurative, and the failure of people to notice their surrounding environment due to their pre-occupation with getting the approval of others, in his short story, "The

The Odyssey - Literary Analysis

718 words - 3 pages named Homer, who was also renowned author of The Iliad. Inside the story, the literary elements of this legend had brought these types of Heroes alive, like a perfected dream becoming into a reality. They are jam-packed throughout the story, bringing the story alive through various techniques. Two specific examples are sensory imagery, and characterization, both of which are exposed the most and play the most vivacious role in Book 12 of the

the storm literary analysis

940 words - 4 pages Kate Chopin, a well known prolific writer of the late nineteenth century, enlightened readers to empathize with the characters in her literary works. Upon reading and analyzing Chopin’s The Storm, the author uses a rich and profound use of setting to avoid the moral judgments of female sexuality and inner turmoil of each character as a means of providing the reader with an understanding of the suppressive nature of women living in a

Literary Analysis of The Story of an Hour

820 words - 4 pages fulfilling marriage. The story goes on to reveal how she is portrayed to others as she is referred to as Louise when everyone thinks her husband is dead, and Mrs. Mallard at the end of the story which suggests she is only herself when her husband is not around. This story is an excellent example of every kind of literary irony there is. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dramatic+irony http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/find-one-example-verbal-situational-dramatic-irony-456956

Survival of the Self-Sufficient

986 words - 4 pages When the Holocaust is featured in literature, survival, interpersonal interactions, and resourcefulness of main characters is often shown. In Maus I and Maus II, Art Spiegelman utilizes the graphic novel format to tell the story of Vladek Spiegelman’s application of bilingual, bartering, and salesmanship skills to survive the tragic lifestyle of camps in the Holocaust. In contrast, in the memoir, Night, by Elie Wiesel, Elie portrays his

Survival of the Sickest Essay

2297 words - 10 pages I have decided to write about four conditions, three of which are detailed in “Survival of the Sickest”, a book written by Dr. Sharon Moalem about how genetic diseases may have evolved to help the human race survive in the past. The diseases which I chose are Hemochromatosis, Diabetes, Transposons, and Sickle cell anemia. I decided to write about hemochromatosis because of how it affects the body by overloading the body with iron, how it

Similar Essays

Lord Of The Flies: Literary Analysis

1314 words - 6 pages ). Even after the initial shock of crash-landing on a presumably deserted island, Piggy is able to gather his wits and realize that their best chance of survival to gather all the boys and get some kind of organization established. Although Ralph found the conch initially, he was only attracted to it because it looked like “a worthy plaything” (16). Piggy however, unlike Ralph, immediately thought up a novel idea of how to use the conch to better

Literary Analysis: The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1968 words - 8 pages to dissuade his readers from having any high expectations. The language in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is completely “American” beyond the need for perfect grammar. “Mark Twain’s novel, of course, is widely considered to be a definitively American literary text.” (Robert Jackson, 48-Regional Theory) Mark Twain deliberately flaunts the use of improper American language and with this novel asks the question “Are you required to speak

Literary Analysis Of The Color Purple

770 words - 4 pages with their family. Having won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983, and also the National Book Award for Fiction, Alice Walker will forever be noted in history for breaking the literary barrier in African American literature. She not only conveyed the importance of blacks, but also distinguished the necessity of African American women in America. “ No one has ever written a novel which so unequivocally posits that the lives and freedom of black women are of crucial importance and concern (insert 111)

Survival Of The Fittest Essay

1931 words - 8 pages Survival of the fittest. This idea, also known as Darwinism, was theorized by scientist Charles Darwin to explain the evolution of animal species. In the late 1800s, however, the idea of Social Darwinism emerged and applied the same concepts of Darwinism but on humans not animals. As defined by the dictionary, Social Darwinism is a belief, popular in the late Victorian era throughout the world, which states that the strongest or toughest