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Literary Works Of The Lost Generation

2782 words - 11 pages

The time after the World War I. was not the best one and why do we know it? It is partly because of the group of writers called the Lost Generation who had experienced the war and the life after and did an amazing job with giving the deep information about their time. This work deals with the characteristics of the Lost Generation’s works.
In the first part of my essay I am going to describe the postwar period’s time. In the second part I will tell you who the lost generation was. In addition I will describe a life and topics of authors whose text I selected. Next, in the third part I will emphasize the characteristic and information, I have learned from the background, in texts, then compare them and find the connections between them.

Life in the USA after World War I
After World War I the world was changed forever. During World War I was rapidly transformed by new technologies and moreover, owing to them the war had a bigger affect on people; the total number of casualties was over 37 million War had forced the generation to grow up quickly, and for those, who had spent years in trenches, war was all they really knew. “What’s to become of us?” asked one soldier to another. “We have lived this life for so long. Now we shall have to start all over again.”
The years immediately after World War I weren’t the most serene. People were not satisfied with the established social and aesthetics conventions at the time and some young artists were trying to do something about it; they gathered to big cities, such as Chicago and San Francisco, in order to protest, exploring their own set of values, the ones that clearly went against what their elders had already established, and to make a new art. Some writers no longer felt the need to stay and went to Europe, mostly to Paris.
The Lost Generation
According to Encyclopedia Britannica, The Lost Generation in general, was the post-World War I generation, but especially a group of U.S. writers who came of age during the war and established their literary reputations in 1920s.
As a centre of writers of the Lost Generation, was considered France - a Salon, in possession of Gertrude Stein. Writers met up in her Salon because they all were looking for new life assurance and new ways in art and literature. Some of them stayed in European exile for longer than others who made good use of their European experience in America.
The writers were at a young age when the World War I. broke out and the experience of this period reflects on their literature works. Except this, other characteristics are: youthful idealism, lost illusions about people and love, hostile point of view at word and also distain for humanism. The most used themes are war, love, friendships and heroism.
As writers of young and bitter ‘lost generation’ we consider, among others, Ernest Hemingway, Francis Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, John Dos Passos and William Faulkner.
Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein was the leading figure of the Lost...

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