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Literature In The Church Essay

881 words - 4 pages

Medieval period was characterized by a single authority that was the Church. During the renaissance period, all that authority was disappearing, everything began to revive all the art, language, became more secular, use of printing press, focused on the individual, new languages, politics, and more people could read and learn about literature not only people like nobles, church, and kings. Many changes occurred during the medieval period to the Renaissance period. Art, language and the church are one of those who had more changes. The change from the medieval period to the renaissance period, had an effect on the language and subjects, including individualism, in church literature.
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In the renaissance period they used the printing press that help to make more books to read. The printing press was invented by a German, Johan Gutenberg. In the medieval tome was more expensive to write books because, they needed to write on parchment but, in the renaissance period was inexpensive printed materials. The printing materials help people to learn more about education.
In the medieval time, everything revolved around the church and its beliefs. People were under hierarchy exerted by the church in the medieval church and had a time of very high money income which caused the monks to do many dishonest things. One of these things was the selling of indulgences. Indulgences were papers that claimed you were excused for your sins. That’s how the church made more money and had enriched all your sordid things that people were doing in the medieval time. In the medieval period the individualism was less common but, in the renaissance period the individualism changed. The Renaissance brought a new interest in education in the arts and humanities. People became less absorbed in the religious hierarchy and more curious about the capabilities of man. Many philosophers began to write about the man and his beliefs and not on the church and not on their religious beliefs. This changed literature in the renaissance period because there were more philosophy books about man.
The art in the medieval period was different from the renaissance period. Medieval art was based on Roman Empire and the Christian church. Medieval had early Christian art, migration period art, byzantine art, insular art, pre-Romanesque and Romanesque art, and gothic art. They had different types of art such...

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